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Conscious Parenting & Your Baby’s Amazing Brain

Did you know, that when a baby is born, his/her brain is ½ the size of an adult brain? By the time he/she is 3 years old, the brain has grown to 80% size of an adult brain. This is incredible growth, in just 3 years. So how does the brain work, and how can we foster this development?   The Working Brain Within the brain there are billions of nerve cells, known as neurons. The neurons have to connect with other brain cells in order to work. Some of these connections are present from birth – for example, the ability to breathe, to suck, to cry and others occur as the baby grows and develops. The connections occur when experiences or skills are repeated over and over. For example you don’t learn how to fly a plane with just one lesson – you need multiple opportunities to practise in order to be competent. Babies are the same – in order to learn to walk, or stack blocks or feed themselves – it doesn’t happen with just one instruction from us. This is why a young baby will drop toys (or food!) over the high chair repeatedly. Parents often think that the child doesn’t want the object. What the baby is learning, is when I drop this book, it goes bang, and when I do it again, it still goes bang. When I drop the orange it rolls away, sometimes it rolls left, sometimes right… they are looking to make the connection (in their brain) between action and response. Once they’ve dropped the book often enough, then they no longer need to do it, because they know it will go bang. Fostering Brain Development Whilst our skulls are hard, the brain within is fragile, and like glass, can be easily damaged. [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:02+00:00 October 20th, 2017|Blog|Comments Off on Conscious Parenting & Your Baby’s Amazing Brain

Transforming Codependency & Creating Passionate Relationships

Codependency is an emotional disorder that causes sufferers to ignore their own needs while constantly fulfilling the needs of others. A sufferer may forfeit his or her own well-being and values in the pursuit of assisting someone else. After experiencing relationship trauma, codependents often form unhealthy relationships due to feelings of low self-worth. Codependents often enter relationships with individuals who are irresponsible, emotionally detached or excessively needy. Such relationships are likely to be  emotionally and sometimes physically abusive. As a result, codependents tend to be downtrodden and oppressed in their relationships. Individuals suffering from codependency will repress their emotions and needs to the point that they are subjected to relationship trauma and extremely low self-esteem. If unaddressed, codependency continues, causing individuals to cope with their emotions by abusing alcohol, drugs, sex or food. Those who seek emotional relief in food can develop eating disorders without realizing the transition. At Trauma Recovery Institute, we help clients look beyond their symptoms and consider the emotional and relational trauma behind codependency in order to better understand their unhealthy coping mechanisms. Working with co dependency at Trauma Recovery Institute Trauma Recovery Institute offers unparalleled services and treatment approach through unique individual and group psychotherapy. We specialise in long-term relational trauma recovery, sexual trauma recovery and early childhood trauma recovery. We also offer specialized group psychotherapy for psychotherapists and psychotherapy students, People struggling with addictions and substance abuse, sexual abuse survivors and people looking to function in life at a higher level. Trauma recovery Institute offers a very safe supportive space for deep relational work with highly skilled and experienced psychotherapists accredited with Irish Group Psychotherapy Society (IGPS), which holds the highest accreditation standard in Europe. Trauma Recovery Institute uses a highly structured psychotherapeutic approach called Dynamic Psychosocialsomatic Psychotherapy (DPP). At Trauma Recovery Institute we address three of [...]

By | 2019-08-13T14:35:09+01:00 October 19th, 2017|Blog|Comments Off on Transforming Codependency & Creating Passionate Relationships

Reignite the Passion in Your Relationship

Desire is a fundamental part of our freedom and happiness. Too many people are unsatisfied with the level of passion in their relationship…when often the path to a wonderful sexuality is just under the surface. But we’re too self-conscious, afraid of rejection or complacent to do anything about it. We spend full weekends at business conferences to learn what’s new and hot in our industries, the days training for that upcoming half marathon, we take up new languages and learn to cook homemade pasta…but when it comes to sex, we’re supposed to know everything we already need to know from terrible sex education in our youth, porn, and conversations with friends. When’s the last time you spent dedicated time learning about, and taking focused steps to improve the one thing that matters most? Great lovers aren’t born, they’re made. And it’s never too late to have an amazing sex life.   Embodied Tantra Coaching for working with difficulties in Sex, Intimacy and Relationships Learn how to be fully alive, fully present with a rich connection with self and your partner, this allows for the richest of human experiences. Learn effective communication skills, and “dissolve” relationship problems created by affairs, projections, past traumas and attachment difficulties. We belive that the relationship is not broken but is a mirror of what needs to be resolved within ourselves and within our relationships. Our relationship coaching approach is based on Imago therapy, encounter centered couples therapy and dynamic psychosocialsomatic psychotherapy. A Tantra coaching session results in re-connection, restores compassion, forgiveness and intimacy, teaches how to make authentic mutual amends, and rebuilds mutual trust for a new future together. Our tantra coaching sessions are suitable for single people, individuals from challenging relationships and for couples. Tantra coaching for working through difficulties with sex, intimacy and relationships, empowering [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:03+00:00 October 19th, 2017|Blog|Comments Off on Reignite the Passion in Your Relationship

The Key to Happiness Revealed by Harvard Study

Essential, data-derived advice for leading a happy, healthy life, shared by researcher and psychiatrist Robert Waldinger. Have you ever wished you could fast-forward your life so you could see if the decisions you’re making will lead to satisfaction and health in the future? In the world of scientific research, the closest you can get to that is by looking at the Harvard Study of Adult Development — a study that has tracked the lives of 724 men for 78 years, and one of the longest studies of adult life ever done. Investigators surveyed the group every two years about their physical and mental health, their professional lives, their friendships, their marriages — and also subjected them to periodic in-person interviews, medical exams, blood tests and brain scans. With a front-row seat on these men’s lives, researchers have been able to track their circumstances and choices and see how the effects ripple through their lives. Psychiatrist Robert J. Waldinger, the study’s director and principal investigator, shared some of the major lessons in a popular TED Talk (What makes a good life? Lessons from the longest study on happiness). The big takeaways from that talk: Good relationships keep us happier and healthier, and loneliness kills. But there were, of course, many more lessons to be learned — the study has yielded more than 100 published papers so far, with enough data for “scores more” — and Waldinger shares four of them here.  1. A happy childhood has very, very long-lasting effects. Having warm relationships with parents in childhood was a good predictor you’ll have warmer and more secure relationships with those closest to you when you’re an adult. Happy childhoods had the power to extend across decades to predict more secure relationships that people had with their spouses in their 80s, as well as [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:03+00:00 October 19th, 2017|Blog|Comments Off on The Key to Happiness Revealed by Harvard Study

Transforming Trauma through Mind, Brain & Body

Nobody can "treat" a war, or abuse, rape, molestation, or any other horrendous event, for that matter; what has happened cannot be undone. But what can be dealt with are the imprints of the trauma on body, mind, and soul: the crushing sensations in your chest that you may label as anxiety or depression; the fear of losing control; always being on alert for danger or rejection; the self-loathing; the nightmares and flashbacks; the fog that keeps you from staying on task and from engaging fully in what you are doing; being unable to fully open your heart to another human being. Trauma robs you of the feeling that you are in charge of yourself. The challenge of recovery is to reestablish ownership of your body and your mind - of your self. This means feeling free to know what you know and to feel what you feel without becoming overwhelmed, enraged, ashamed, or collapsed. For most people this involves (1) finding a way to become calm and focused, (2) learning to maintain that calm in response to images, thoughts, sounds, or physical sensations that remind you of the past, (3) finding a way to be fully alive in the present and engaged with the people around you, (4) not having to keep secrets from yourself, including secrets about the ways that you have managed to survive. - Bessel Van Der Kolk     Treatment of Relational and complex Trauma at Trauma Recovery Institute Trauma Recovery Institute offers unparalleled services and treatment approach through unique individual and group psychotherapy. We specialise in long-term relational trauma recovery, sexual trauma recovery and early childhood trauma recovery. We also offer specialized group psychotherapy for psychotherapists and psychotherapy students, People struggling with addictions and substance abuse, sexual abuse survivors and people looking to function [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:04+00:00 June 20th, 2017|Blog|Comments Off on Transforming Trauma through Mind, Brain & Body

Co Creating a committed Passionate Relationship

When we meet our partners, we make an unconscious contract to help each other resolve emotional injuries of the past , we unconsciously pick or hire the perfect person to trigger this stored painful memory of our past , it is for this exact reason we have come together . Relationships are not a problem to be solved but an adventure to be embraced. Conflict is a gift to be unpacked , to embrace, an opportunity to grow , resolve and mature . Conflict can not be resolved at the level with which it was created. We hire the person in our life who is most compatible to help us resolve what is unresolved from our childhood. Our relationship lives in the space between us and it is sacred . This becomes the playground for our children . When there are only two options , take the third option ! Keep the space between you safe and sacred . Honour the space between you , by visiting the other by crossing the bridge . Cross the bridge with an open mind to learn , with curiosity and compassion , leave behind your hurt and trauma. Crossing the bridge is becoming completely present with your partner, listening without interruption, defensiveness or judgement, holding an unconditional space for your partner to share. Beyond right thinking and Beyond wrong thinking there is a field , I will meet you there - This is the third option   Seven principles for conscious relationships 1. The relationship lives in the space between us. 2. The emotional charged part of your partner is the child in them trying to tell their story , allow each other to tell that story by crossing the bridge. 3. We are energy that can be positive and negative , be aware of this [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:05+00:00 June 3rd, 2017|Blog|Comments Off on Co Creating a committed Passionate Relationship

Co Creating a Passionate Committed Relationship

When we meet our partners, we make an unconscious contract to help each other resolve emotional injuries of the past , we unconsciously pick or hire the perfect person to trigger this stored painful memory of our past , it is for this exact reason we have come together . Relationships are not a problem to be solved but an adventure to be embraced. Conflict is a gift to be unpacked , to embrace, an opportunity to grow , resolve and mature . Conflict can not be resolved at the level with which it was created. We hire the person in our life who is most compatible to help us resolve what is unresolved from our childhood. Our relationship lives in the space between us and it is sacred . This becomes the playground for our children . When there are only two options , take the third option ! Keep the space between you safe and sacred . Honour the space between you , by visiting the other by crossing the bridge . Cross the bridge with an open mind to learn , with curiosity and compassion , leave behind your hurt and trauma. Crossing the bridge is becoming completely present with your partner, listening without interruption, defensiveness or judgement, holding an unconditional space for your partner to share. Beyond right thinking and Beyond wrong thinking there is a field , I will meet you there - This is the third option   Seven principles for conscious relationships 1. The relationship lives in the space between us. 2. The emotional charged part of your partner is the child in them trying to tell their story , allow each other to tell that story by crossing the bridge. 3. We are energy that can be positive and negative , be aware of this [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:06+00:00 June 3rd, 2017|Blog|Comments Off on Co Creating a Passionate Committed Relationship

Conscious Parenting Training & Support at Conscious Parenting Ireland

At conscious parenting Ireland we offer individual parenting consultations and conscious parenting weekly groups to explore conscious parenting and optimal child development with one or both parents. A parenting philosophy is relevant only to the extent that it promotes parenting practices which support secure bonding. Our effectiveness as parents is in direct proportion to the strength of the bond we have with our child. Securing and maintaining that bond is our primary work as parents and is the key to optimal human development. If as parents we have not resolved our own history of insecure attachment with our own caregivers, trauma and/or neglect as a child then it becomes extremely difficult to establish and maintain a secure bond with our children. We pass down trauma from one generation to another and learnt maladaptive interpersonal behaviours are communicated consciously and unconsciously encoded in verbal and non verbal interactions with our children. If we have not had a present loving caring safe nurturing attuned parent , then it will be extremely difficult for us to provide this for our children. Individual consultations and group work are extremely effective in supporting parents to explore and heal from their own traumatic histories whilst also learning effect toools and healthy parenting skills to create secure bonds with their children which is necessary for optimal brain development. Our nervous system is experience dependant, our early experiences are wired into our nervous system. If we grow up in a stressed anxious home, then we become stressed and anxious as adults. Our Conscious Parenting group takes place weekly. This group is a support group for parents facilitated through the framework of conscious parenting philosophy and a safe supprtive space to explore your own attachment styles.     Dr. Maté speaking for the Healing our Children 2016 World Summit [...]

By | 2018-01-15T12:18:20+00:00 May 17th, 2017|Blog|Comments Off on Conscious Parenting Training & Support at Conscious Parenting Ireland

Neuroscience Informed Group Psychotherapy Dublin

Neuroscience informed group psychotherapy facilitated by trauma specialists at Trauma Recovery Institute Dublin. The advanced group psychotherapy is suitable for psychotherapy students and those who have at least 4 years experience with psychotherapy.The psychotherapeutic approach applied is Dynamic Psychosocialsomatic Psychotherapy (DPP) which is a very unique blend of interpersonal neurobiology, psychodynamic psychotherapy and transference focused psyschotherapy incorporating the poly vagal theory by stephen porges. This group is a very effective platform to work through the neurobiology of trauma with the nervous system always in mind, keeping the client safe and in felt sense at all times.     Treatment of Relational and complex Trauma at Trauma Recovery Institute Trauma Recovery Institute offers unparalleled services and treatment approach through unique individual and group psychotherapy. We specialise in long-term relational trauma recovery, sexual trauma recovery and early childhood trauma recovery. We also offer specialized group psychotherapy for psychotherapists and psychotherapy students, People struggling with addictions and substance abuse, sexual abuse survivors and people looking to function in life at a higher level. Trauma recovery Institute offers a very safe supportive space for deep relational work with highly skilled and experienced psychotherapists accredited with Irish Group Psychotherapy Society (IGPS), which holds the highest accreditation standard in Europe. Trauma Recovery Institute uses a highly structured psychotherapeutic approach called Dynamic Psychosocialsomatic Psychotherapy (DPP). At Trauma Recovery Institute we address three of the core Attachment Styles, their origin’s the way they reveal themselves in relationships, and methods for transforming attachment hurt into healing. We use the latest discoveries in Neuroscience which enhances our capacity for deepening intimacy. The foundation for establishing healthy relationships relies on developing secure attachment skills, thus increasing your sensitivity for contingency and relational attunement. According to Allan Schore, the regulatory function of the brain is experience-dependent and he says that, as an infant, [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:07+00:00 May 2nd, 2017|Blog|Comments Off on Neuroscience Informed Group Psychotherapy Dublin

Conscious Parenting Coaching for optimum child development

At conscious parenting Ireland we offer individual parenting consultations to explore conscious parenting and optimal child development with one or both parents. A parenting philosophy is relevant only to the extent that it promotes parenting practices which support secure bonding. Our effectiveness as parents is in direct proportion to the strength of the bond we have with our child. Securing and maintaining that bond is our primary work as parents and is the key to optimal human development. If as parents we have not resolved our own history of insecure attachment with our own caregivers, trauma and/or neglect as a child then it becomes extremely difficult to establish and maintain a secure bond with our children. We pass down trauma from one generation to another and learnt maladaptive interpersonal behaviours are communicated consciously and unconsciously encoded in verbal and non verbal interactions with our children. If we have not had a present loving caring safe nurturing attuned parent , then it will be extremely difficult for us to provide this for our children. Individual consultations and group work are extremely effective in supporting parents to explore and heal from their own traumatic histories whilst also learning effect toools and health parenting skills to create secure bonds with their children which is necessary for optimal brain development. Our nervous system is experience dependant, our early experiences are wired into our nervous system. If we grow up in a stressed anxious home, then we become stressed and anxious as adults.   Dr. Maté speaking for the Healing our Children 2016 World Summit on why he believes that every disorder and disease has its roots in early childhood, why our culture hasn't supported healthy childhood development for years, and what we can do about it. Dr. Mate confirms that raher than looking at [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:07+00:00 May 1st, 2017|Blog|Comments Off on Conscious Parenting Coaching for optimum child development

Advanced Group Psychotherapy Dublin

Group Psychotherapy, why it is good for all of us. As humans we are social animals who remains group-oriented to ensure survival, connection and belonging. Our lives begin in family groups and we function thereafter as members of groups at school, work and in communities. The origin of the power of the group as an agent of change to promote healing lies buried in antiquity. But, as noted by Rutan and Alonso (1979), group psychotherapy, where one’s family and community are represented in the room, provides unique opportunities to work on issues of intimacy and individuation. It is well known that anyone with a history of destructive relationships will continue, long into adult life, continue to attract destructive relationships into their lives as a debilitating and painful life pattern. Group Psychotherapy becomes a very powerful platform to change this pattern as it is explored within a framework of healthy relating within the group. Even for those without a history of overt trauma can carry behaviors from primary relationships as a child and continue these behaviors into adult life even when these behaviors do not serve as healthy prerequisites for healthy, happy and intimate relationships. In a sense these unconscious behaviors get in the way of Life, very often it can be difficult to make sense of why life is not working as we would like or relationships are not as successful as we would like and without a platform such as Group Psychotherapy, it is very difficult to explore these behaviors and work through these early relational patterns that are getting in the way of health and happiness.   "Everyone sees the unseen in proportion to the clarity of his heart, and that depends upon how much he has polished it. Whoever has polished it more sees more — more unseen forms become [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:08+00:00 April 28th, 2017|Blog|Comments Off on Advanced Group Psychotherapy Dublin

Plant Based Skin Care & Cosmetics at Plant Based Academy

Everything that comes into contact with your skin is absorbed into your body, processed and detoxified by your liver. Conventional body “care” products are laced with chemicals that disrupt hormones and the body’s natural balance. A great exercise is to go through your bathroom cabinets and read the labels of all your body care products. Count how many chemicals you would usually be adding to your body on a daily basis.   Skin Flora - S. epidermidis Skin flora or skin microbiota is the bacteria living on the skin which is usually non-pathogenic, and either commensal (are not harmful to their host) or mutualistic (offer a benefit). The benefits bacteria can offer include preventing transient pathogenic organisms from colonizing the skin surface, either by competing for nutrients, secreting chemicals against them, or stimulating the skin's immune system. The skin barrier is critical for survival, preventing the escape of moisture and invasion by infectious or toxic substances (Segre 2006). The skin is also an intricate habitat for a diverse population of microbiota. During the birthing process and subsequent exposure to the post-natal environment, the skin is colonized by a wide array of microbes, many of which are commensal or symbiotic. Proposed beneficial roles of resident microbiota include inhibition of pathogenic species and further processing of skin proteins, free fatty acids, and sebum (Roth and James 1988). The skin is composed of a variety of niches, including regions with a broad range of pH, temperature, moisture, and sebum content. Furthermore, skin structures such as hair follicles, sebaceous, eccrine, and apocrine glands comprise subhabitats that may be associated with their own unique microbiota (Marples 1965; Kearney et al. 1984).Such as S. epidermidis. The removal of S. epidermidis (i.e. through overuse of topical antibiotics, soaps and sun blocks) may be detrimental to the host [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:08+00:00 April 27th, 2017|Blog|Comments Off on Plant Based Skin Care & Cosmetics at Plant Based Academy

Covert Abuse and Emotional Incest Explained

The term Emotional Incest (also known as covert incest or psychic incest) describes a relationship between parents and children that is sexualized, without actual incest/sexual contact. The relationships are harmful and one-sided, and similar to a relationship between adult sexual partners but without the type of physical contact that would qualify it as child sexual abuse. The effects are similar to, though less severe, than that of actual incest. The definition of Emotional Incest has a broad set of criteria. Basically, Emotional Incest, is a covert incest, a form of emotional abuse in which the relationship between a parent and a child is inappropriately sexualized without actual sexual contact. Often substance abuse, as seen through the alcoholic dependent needy dysfunctional parent for instance, is associated with covert incest. The effects of this covert incest somewhat mimic sexual incest but often to a lesser degree. The victims have been described as having anger or guilt towards parents and issues with self-esteem, addiction and sexual and emotional intimacy Emotional Incest started to be recognized about 25 or 30 years ago. It has primarily been defined by the few researchers and therapists who acknowledge it and work with it, as as an emotionally abusive relationship between a parent (or step-parent) and child that does not involve incest or sexual intercourse. It involves similar interpersonal dynamics much like the relationship between sexual partners. Particularly similar to ‘old time’ seasoned partners who have gotten comfortable with each other, marriages where sex is no longer the prime purpose in their lives, but the emotional support and bond is strong between the members of the relationship. Think of the couple that has been married for many years, sex has waned, or is non-existent, but they still rely on each other, and at times need each other, for [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:09+00:00 April 26th, 2017|Blog|Comments Off on Covert Abuse and Emotional Incest Explained

Characteristics of a Sex and Love Addict

The following are some Characteristics of sex and love addiction that we have used to hide the progressive loss of self, which is at the heart of the disease:   Having few healthy boundaries, we become emotionally and sexually involved with people without knowing them. Out of fear of abandonment or loneliness, we stay in or return to painful, destructive relationships, always struggling to conceal our dependency. Real intimacy is rare, if it has ever existed. Fearing emotional or sexual deprivation, we compulsively pursue and involve ourselves with one relationship after another, sometimes having more than one sexual or emotional affair at a time. We confuse love with such things as neediness intensity, pity, sexual or physical attraction, being a victim or being a rescuer. We feel empty or incomplete when we are alone. Though we fear both intimacy and commitment, we continually search for relationships or sexual contacts. We sexualize stress, guilt loneliness, anger, fear and envy. We use sex or emotional dependence as substitutes for nurturing, support and understanding. We manipulate and control others with drama and sexuality We become immobilized or seriously distracted by sexual or romantic obsessions and fantasies. We avoid personal responsibility by attaching ourselves to people who are emotionally unavailable. We stay in denial about our addiction to emotional intensity, romantic intrigue and compulsive sexual activity. To avoid feeling vulnerable, we may retreat from all intimate involvement mistaking sexual and emotional anorexia for recovery. We assign magical qualities to others. We idealize and pursue them, then we blame them for not fulfilling our fantasies and expectations.     Sex is one of the most powerful forces in the human condition. It can drive individuals to the pinnacle of emotional and physical ecstasy or, conversely, spiral other people into depths of despair and anguish. The [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:10+00:00 April 26th, 2017|Blog|Comments Off on Characteristics of a Sex and Love Addict

Characteristics of a Sex and Love Addict

The following are some Characteristics of sex and love addiction that we have used to hide the progressive loss of self, which is the heart of disease: 1. Having few healthy boundaries, we become emotionally and sexually involved with people without knowing them. 2. Out of fear of abandonment or loneliness, we stay in or return to painful, destructive relationships, always struggling to conceal our dependency. Real intimacy is rare, if it has ever existed. 3. Fearing emotional or sexual deprivation, we compulsively pursue and involve ourselves with one relationship after another, sometimes having more than one sexual or emotional affair at a time. 4. We confuse love with such things as neediness intensity, pity, sexual or physical attraction, being a victim or being a rescuer. 5. We feel empty or incomplete when we are alone. Though we fear both intimacy and commitment, we continually search for relationships or sexual contacts. 6. We sexualize stress, guilt loneliness, anger, fear and envy. We use sex or emotional dependence as substitutes for nurturing, support and understanding. 7. We manipulate and control others with drama and sexuality 8. We become immobilized or seriously distracted by sexual or romantic obsessions and fantasies. 9. We avoid personal responsibility by attaching ourselves to people who are emotionally unavailable. 10. We stay in denial about our addiction to emotional intensity, romantic intrigue and compulsive sexual activity. 11. To avoid feeling vulnerable, we may retreat from all intimate involvement mistaking sexual and emotional anorexia for recovery. 12. We assign magical qualities to others. We idealize and pursue them, then we blame them for not fulfilling our fantasies and expectations.

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:11+00:00 April 26th, 2017|Blog|Comments Off on Characteristics of a Sex and Love Addict

Stress and Health – From Molecules to Societies

Exposure to extreme threat, particularly early in life, combined with a lack of adequate caregiving responses significantly affect the long-term capacity of the human organism to modulate the response of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems in response to subsequent stress. The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is primarily geared to mobilization by preparing the body for action by increasing cardiac output, stimulating sweat glands, and by inhibiting the gastrointestinal tract. Since the SNS has long been associated with emotion, a great deal of work on the role of the SNS has been collected to identify autonomic “signatures” of specific affective states. Overall, increased adrenergic activity is found in about two-thirds of traumatized children and adults. The parasympathetic branch of the ANS not only influences HR independently of the sympathetic branch, but makes a greater contribution to HR, including resting HR. Vagal fibers originating in the brainstem affect emotional and behavioral responses to stress by inhibiting sympathetic influence to the sinoatrial node and promoting rapid decreases in metabolic output that enable almost instantaneous shifts in behavioral state. The parasympathetic system consists of two branches: the ventral vagal complex (VVC) and the dorsal vagal complex (DVC) systems. The DVC is primarily associated with digestive, taste, and hypoxic responses in mammals. The DVC contributes to pathophysiological conditions including the formation of ulcers via excess gastric secretion and colitis. In contrast, the VVC has the primary control of supradiaphragmatic visceral organs including the larynx, pharynx, bronchi, esophagus, and heart. The VVC inhibits the mobilization of the SNS, enabling rapid engagement and disengagement in the environment. "A great body of evidence suggests that prenatal insults represent main risk factors for developing schizophrenia later in life and that exposure to a very different range of prenatal insults seems to converge to comparable effects on the fetal [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:12+00:00 December 10th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Stress and Health – From Molecules to Societies

Perspectives on Transferences

Transferences, unlike descriptive unconscious processes are dynamically repressed object attachments that transfer in the wrong place with compulsive, repetitive and affective charge. - Freud Transference, Countertransference and reenactment in Therapy by Richard B. Gartner- Director of centre for the study of psychological Trauma and The Sexual Abuse Program New York city. Recurrent themes affecting the transference and countertransference with people who have suffered huge trauma in early childhood, start with the patient’s wariness of the therapist and the dangers involved in intimacy. In addition, dependency, reliance and counter dependent and counter phobic defenses tend to emerge, often-cloaked in overt idealization of the therapist. In this idealization, patients may expect the therapist to be all attentive, nurturing, non-seductive and nonabusing parent who will heal and undo the trauma. All these themes tend to appear in concerns about boundaries, secrecy, control and power and in dicussion of fees, confidentiality, and other issues related to the frame of the treatment. Behavioral reenactments in treatment allow a patient to communicate previously dissociated and therefore unsymbolised, material to the therapist. By exploring verbally what has been communicated through behavior the therapist and patient initiate a process by which the dissociated material becomes encoded in language, and therefore available for conscious consideration.Behaviors associated with a reenactment in therapy are unconscious messages from the patient to the therapist and to himself about a traumatic past. They represent an attempt to bypass the need for symbolized experience. Reenactments are most likely to occur when the patient has a reduced capacity for self-reflection, another result of being unable to verbalize traumatic experiences that were never encoded when they first occurred, as a result of not have a present witness to their pain. Memories became trapped encased within a wordless world. Incapable of articulating what he has never symbolized verbally, [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:12+00:00 December 1st, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Perspectives on Transferences

What is Borderline Personality Disorder and how can I heal this

Personality disorder, as a term, may sound negative and judgmental and it is important to have a clear understanding with our patients of the meaning of the term. We explain that there is a group of disorders in the DSM-V, six of them to be specific, that are thought to be long-term and enduring, in contrast to episodic, personality styles that at their core are defined by difficulties in the person’s subjective, internal sense of identity, and chronic difficulties in his or her interpersonal relationships. It is noteworthy that the DSM-V description of personality disorders includes this emphasis on sense of self and relations with others more than the previous editions of the DSM did. We explain that the six different styles have many overlapping features and that most people have a mixture of those styles, but most importantly, that when people personify and live out any of those styles with a certain consistency, inflexibility, and in such a way that causes a certain level of distress in one’s emotional and interpersonal life, they meet criteria for a personality disorder. For patients with BPD, in reviewing the DSM-IV symptoms that the particular patient in question meets, we note that there are different sub-types of BPD patients, each with different sets of primary or most-problematic features. Some may be more impulsive and overtly inappropriately angry, whereas others may be more “under the radar,” characterized more prominently by the sense of emptiness, fears of abandonment, suicidal feelings, and more subtle shifts in their experience of others, from idealizing others to more quietly feeling devaluing or contemptuous of them. So with each patient we explain our understanding of his or her BPD symptoms. We also find it helpful to give an overview of BPD as a disorder comprising difficulties in four areas: 1) [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:13+00:00 November 15th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on What is Borderline Personality Disorder and how can I heal this

Trauma, Intimacy and the Poly Vagal Theory

The Polyvagal Theory is the product of decades of research by Dr Stephen Porges and his team at the Brain-Body Center in the University of Illinois, Chicago. Adopted by clinicians around the world, the Polyvagal Theory has provided exciting new insights into the way our autonomic nervous system unconsciously mediates social engagement, trust, and intimacy, and how these may be influenced by our interactions with others.It was whilst studying the evolution of the nervous system that Porges first made an important discovery concerning the vagus nerve which alters the way we understand autonomic nervous system functions. Before this time it was widely understood that our autonomic nervous system operated in a balanced sympathetic/parasympathetic manner, but Porges research changed this through two discoveries; firstly that the vagus nerve in mammals has not one but two branches, and secondly that the newest branch is able to inhibit other nervous system activity. Porges research showed that in the process of evolution, animals first developed immobilised defense responses (innervated by the vagus/parasympathetic system) –where they would adaptively collapse, shut down or feign death when faced with threats. Over time, the nervous system evolved to enable mobilised responses to threat through the activation of a sympathetic nervous system. This mobilised circuitry was able to speed up the heart and lungs, and act on the same visceral organs as the parasympathetic system, in order to promote adaptive fight, flight and active freeze responses to threat. The third stage of evoluntionary development saw the addition of a newer branch of the vagus nerve which is also able to slow the heart and lungs and which links the innervation of these two with the use of facial nerves involved in social engagement. For this reason, Porges theory proposes that this newer Vagal ̳brake‘ evolved in order to make [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:13+00:00 October 31st, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Trauma, Intimacy and the Poly Vagal Theory

The Neurological Legacy of Childhood Trauma

It’s almost common knowledge that many people who experienced trauma as children have a harder time in adult life. Indeed, over the past few decades, well-designed studies have verified this impression by finding that a great number of such people really do have a greater chance of depression, anxiety, or other psychological disorders, behavioral and social problems, and poorer health outcomes. Mental illness, addiction & most chronic illness is linked to childhood loss & trauma (Gabor Maté) Less well known is that trauma – even in the absence of physical trauma– can have negative impacts on the brain itself that last into adulthood. Studies on the neurological effects of stress and trauma have consistently shown structural and functional neurological changes, though the specific nature of these changes is currently unclear. A consistent theme, however, is that trauma especially affects one of the body’s key stress response systems, the HPA (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal) axis. For example, the hippocampus, a brain region involved in memory and emotion and rich in receptors for stress hormones, has been shown to be smaller in traumatized adults – including adults traumatized as children – than in those without such history. Children can be traumatized not only by the same things that can traumatize adults – for example, direct physical/sexual abuse, natural disasters, or events related to war – but also by experiences that would likely affect an adult differently or not at all, such as neglect, verbal aggression, witnessing abuse within the family, a chaotic home environment, or inadequate nutrition. In a way, this stands to reason, because these experiences may subvert the critical developmental stages a child passes through on the way to adulthood.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lOeQUwdAjE0 A person who experiences early trauma, regardless of its source, does not feel welcomed into the world. When, at the [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:15+00:00 October 25th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on The Neurological Legacy of Childhood Trauma

Getting to the root of Chronic Fatigue

Depression is a common symptom of hypothyroidism, yet many people become frustrated when their thyroid hormone medication does not relieve depression. This is because the effects of hypothyroidism on the brain are more complicated than people realize and thyroid hormone medication alone may not solve brain-based problems such as depression. The problem is many people suffer from hypothyroidism for years before receiving diagnosis and treatment, raising their likelihood of developing brain-based issues–sufficient thyroid hormone is vital to good brain health. Thyroid hormones facilitate function of the brain’s neurotransmitters, chemicals that communicate information throughout the bran and body. They also prevent brain inflammation and reduce the risk of developing an autoimmune reaction in the brain. When doctors in the standard health care model fail to properly manage hypothyroidism, they increase their patients’ risks for brain-based disorders.   Hypothyroidism and neurotransmitters   Neurotransmitters play a role in shaping who we are and how we perceive ourselves and the world around us. They influence our moods, memory and learning, self-esteem, anxiety levels, motivation, and more. I think this explains why some people who have been suffering for years with unresolved thyroid symptoms can become grouchy, angry, and pessimistic. That reflects not who they are necessarily, but instead their worsening brain function. As neurotransmitter function begins to fail due to thyroid hormone deficiency, the brain’s cells increasingly lose the ability to communicate with one another. This lack of activity causes neurons to die, creating accelerated brain degeneration in those pathways. When it comes to brain health, if you don’t use it you lose it—inactive neurons are swept up and discarded by the brain’s immune system. This is a scenario that cause a variety of symptoms, one of the more common being depression. When thyroid hormone replacement fails to resolve your depression you may need to support [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:17+00:00 October 16th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Getting to the root of Chronic Fatigue

Leaky Gut Syndrome (LGS), Chronic Fatigue & Fibroids

Leaky Gut Syndrome (LGS) is a major cause of disease and dysfunction in modern society, accounts for at least 50% of chronic complaints, as confirmed by laboratory tests. In LGS, the epithelium on the villi of the small intestine becomes inflamed and irritated, which allows metabolic and microbial toxins of the small intestines to flood into the blood stream. This event compromises the liver, the lymphatic system, and the immune response including the endocrine system. Some of the most incurable diseases are caused by this exact mechanism, where the body attacks its own tissues. This is commonly called auto-immune disease. It is often the primary cause of the following common conditions: asthma, food allergies, chronic sinusitis, eczema, urticaria, migraine, irritable bowel, fungal disorders, fibromyalgia, and inflammatory joint disorders including rheumatoid arthritis are just a few of the diseases that can originate with leaky gut. It also contributes to PMS, uterine fibroid, and breast fibroid. Leaky Gut Syndrome is often the real basis for chronic fatigue syndrome and pediatric immune deficiencies. Leaky Gut Syndrome is reaching epidemic proportions within the population. Historically, the only way bowel toxins entered the blood stream was through trauma, for example by sword or spear. This quickly led to septicemia that might be treatable, or more probably, ended in death. Outside of trauma, the body maintained a wonderfully effective selective barrier in the small intestine, one that allowed nutrients to enter, but kept out metabolic wastes and microbial toxins rampant in the intestines.   What Modern Event Allowed Such A Break-Down? Primarily it has been antibiotics, secondarily non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, Motrin, Aleve and Advil) with NSAIDs being the major cause of leaky gut because they so viciously inflame the intestinal lining, causing a widening of the spaces between cells and sometimes hemorrhaging. Other common causes are chemotherapy, ingested alcohol, inhaled formaldehyde from [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:17+00:00 October 16th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Leaky Gut Syndrome (LGS), Chronic Fatigue & Fibroids

The Germ Theory & The Gut

The gut (gastrointestinal tract) is the long tube that starts at the mouth and ends at the back passage (anus). The mouth is the first part of the gut (gastrointestinal tract). When we eat, food passes down the gullet (oesophagus), into the stomach, and then into the small intestine. The small intestine has three sections - the duodenum, jejunum and ileum. The duodenum is the first part of the small intestine and follows on from the stomach. The duodenum curls around the pancreas creating a c-shaped tube. The jejunum and ileum make up the rest of the small intestine and are found coiled in the centre of the tummy (abdomen). The small intestine is the place where food is digested and absorbed into the bloodstream. Following on from the ileum is the first part of the large intestine, called the caecum. Attached to the caecum is the appendix. The large intestine continues upwards from here and is known as the ascending colon. The next part of the gut is called the transverse colon because it crosses the body. It then becomes the descending colon as it heads downwards. The sigmoid colon is the s-shaped final part of the colon which leads on to the rectum. Stools (faeces) are stored in the rectum and pushed out through the back passage (anus) when you go to the toilet. The anus is a muscular opening that is usually closed unless you are passing stool. The large intestine absorbs water and contains food that has not been digested, such as fibre. The gut (gastrointestinal tract) processes food - from the time it is first eaten until it is either absorbed by the body or passed out as stools (faeces). The process of digestion begins in the mouth. Here your teeth and chemicals made by [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:19+00:00 September 26th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on The Germ Theory & The Gut

Clinic Space to Let in Dublin 1

Professional spacious clinical room available to let. Three days per week available. Suitable for counselling, nutritional therapy & consulting, psychotherapy, psychology assessments and consultations. Committment is monthly fee in advance for the requested time. Building is newly renovated in a fantastic location close to connolly station. Please express interest in the form below. 5G Wifi. Comfortable armchairs and working Desk. Small waiting area. Kitchen and Bathroom. Ideal from Psychology, Trauma work and Psychotherapy.

By | 2019-01-20T00:39:53+00:00 August 24th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Clinic Space to Let in Dublin 1

Conscious Parenting Consultations , working towards a secure bond with our children

Conscious parenting is parenting through connection instead of coercion, through love instead of fear.Conscious Parenting recognizes that securing and maintaining a healthy parent-child bond is our primary work as parents and the key to our children's optimal human development. Our effectiveness as parents is in direct proportion to the strength of the bond we have with our child. Connection Parenting promotes parenting practices that support a strong, healthy parent-child bond.The Latest Neuroscience now confirms attachement theory and the critical importance of the parent child attachment, This above all will influence the appropriate brain development of your child and influence the adult your child will become. The model of parenting most of us grew up with was authoritarian parenting, which is based on fear. Some of us may have grown up with permissive parenting, which is also based on fear. Authoritarian parenting is based on the child's fear of losing the parent's love. Permissive parenting is based on the parent's fear of losing the child's love. Connection parenting is based on love instead of fear. Connection Parenting recognizes that securing and maintaining a healthy parent-child bond is our primary work as parents and the key to our children's optimal human development. Our effectiveness as parents is in direct proportion to the strength of the bond we have with our child. Connection Parenting promotes parenting practices that support a strong, healthy parent-child bond. Both authoritarian parenting and permissive parenting are reactive. Connection parenting is proactive. Rather than focusing on ways to discipline children when their feelings of disconnection result in uncooperative or unacceptable behavior, Connection Parenting focuses on ways to maintain and increase the parent-child bond/connection. Connection parenting is an ideal, a navigation star we can look to for guidance. Whenever we question how to respond to a child we can ask ourselves, will [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:21+00:00 August 23rd, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Conscious Parenting Consultations , working towards a secure bond with our children

The Neurobiology of stress on the brain- Gut Connection, healing with plant based foods

How the Hidden Conversation Within Our Bodies Impacts Our Mood, Our Choices, and Our Overall Health. Combining cutting-edge neuroscience with the latest discoveries on the human microbiome, a practical guide in the tradition of The Second Brain, and The Good Gut that conclusively demonstrates the inextricable, biological link between mind and the digestive system. We have all experienced the connection between our mind and our gut—the decision we made because it “felt right”; the butterflies in our stomach before a big meeting; the anxious stomach rumbling we get when we’re stressed out. While the dialogue between the gut and the brain has been recognized by ancient healing traditions, including Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine, Western medicine has by and large failed to appreciate the complexity of how the brain, gut, and more recently, the gut microbiota—the microorganisms that live inside our digestive tract—communicate with one another. In our 8 week Life Change Program you will gain a greater understanding of Neurobiology of Stress and how this impacts your brain and gut, our gut repair program is a powerful online tool with comprehensive practical steps teaching you how to harness the power of the mind-gut connection to take charge of your health and listen to the innate wisdom of your body.   Read more about The 8 Week Life Change Program with Plant Based Academy The latest in Gut-Brain Research is showimng us: ∙ Why consuming a predominantly plant-based diet is key for gut and brain health. ∙ The importance of early childhood in gut-brain development. . What parents can do to help their children thrive in gut - brain development. . The role of excessive stress and anxiety in GI ailments and cognitive disorders. . How to “listen to your gut” and pay attention to the signals your body is sending [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:22+00:00 August 22nd, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on The Neurobiology of stress on the brain- Gut Connection, healing with plant based foods

Individual & Couples Tantra Counselling for working with relational conflict

Intimate relationships are our universities of the heart. In them we will find challenges and blessings, ecstasy and sorrows, and come to realise that our lovers are our mirrors and we are reflected in their eyes. If there is conflict in our relationships it is because we ourselves are in conflict; if there is joy and fulfillment it is because we have found peace within ourselves. ~Ross Haven   When we meet our partners, we make an unconscious contract to help each other resolve emotional injuries of the past , we unconsciously pick or hire the perfect person to trigger this stored painful memory of our past , it is for this exact reason we have come together . Relationships are not a problem to be solved but an adventure to be embraced. Conflict is a gift to be unpacked , to embrace, an opportunity to grow , resolve and mature . Conflict can not be resolved at the level with which it was created. We hire the person in our life who is most compatible to help us resolve what is unresolved from our childhood. Our relationship lives in the space between us and it is sacred . This becomes the playground for our children . When there are only two options , take the third option ! Keep the space between you safe and sacred . Honour the space between you , by visiting the other by crossing the bridge . Cross the bridge with an open mind to learn , with curiosity and compassion , leave behind your hurt and trauma. Crossing the bridge is becoming completely present with your partner, listening without interruption, defensiveness or judgement, holding an unconditional space for your partner to share.   Beyond right thinking and Beyond wrong thinking there is a field , I [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:22+00:00 August 22nd, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Individual & Couples Tantra Counselling for working with relational conflict

Developing a secure attachment through the psychotherapeutic relationship

The Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study is one of the largest investigations ever conducted to assess associations between childhood maltreatment and later-life health and well-being. The study is a collaboration between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Kaiser Permanente's Health Appraisal Clinic in San Diego. More than 17,000 Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) members undergoing a comprehensive physical examination chose to provide detailed information about their childhood experience of abuse, neglect, and family dysfunction. To date, more than 50 scientific articles have been published and more than100 conference and workshop presentations have been made. The ACE Study findings suggest that certain experiences are major risk factors for the leading causes of illness and death as well as poor quality of life. Neglect, physical abuse, custodial interference and sexual abuse are types of child maltreatment that can lead to poor physical and mental health well into adulthood. It is critical to understand how some of the worst health and social problems in our nation can arise as a consequence of adverse childhood experiences. Realizing these connections is likely to improve efforts towards prevention and recovery. If you are suffering with an illness or addiction, finding relationships challenging, attracting the wrong people into your life, continously falling in love with an emotionally unavailable partners, struggling with porn, sex & love addictions, or struggling to find joy in life. There is a very high possibility that you have suffered adverse childhood experiences regardless of how covert they may seem and when left unresolved can manifest in a host of life challenges with Money, Sex, relationships, mental Health, emotional health and physical health. It is important to note that working through early childhood adverse experiences is not about blaming parents, and does not have to mean talking for long periods of time about [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:23+00:00 August 16th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Developing a secure attachment through the psychotherapeutic relationship

Dissociation, Dissociative Disorders & The Therapeutic Relationship

Trauma can be conceptualized as stemming from a failure of the natural physiological activation and hormonal secretions to organize an effective response to threat. Rather than producing a successful fight or flight response the organism becomes immobilized. Probably the best animal model for this phenomenon is that of ‘inescapable shock,” in which creatures are tortured without being unable to do anything to affect the outcome of events. The resulting failure to fight or flight, that is, the physical immobilization (the freeze response), becomes a conditioned behavioral response. In his book, Affect Regulation and the Origin of the Self, Allen Schore has outlined in exquisite detail the psychobiology of early childhood development involving maturation of orbitofrontal and limbic structures based on reciprocal experiences with the caregiver. Dysfunctional associations in this dyadic relationship result in permanent physicochemical and anatomical changes, which have implications for personality development as well as for a wide variety of clinical manifestations. An intimate relationship may exist, with negative child/care giver interaction leading to a state of persisting hypertonicity of the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems that may profoundly affect the arousal state of the developing child. Sustained hyperarousal in these children may markedly affect behavioral and characterological development. Many traumatized children and adults, confronted with chronically overwhelming emotions, lose their capacity to use emotions as guides for effective action. They often do not recognize what they are feeling and fail to mount an appropriate response. This phenomenon is called alexithymia, an inability to identify the meaning of physical sensations and muscle activation. Failure to recognize what is going on causes them to be out of touch with their needs, and, as a consequence, they are unable to take care of them. This inability to correctly identify sensations, emotions, and physical states often extends itself to having difficulty appreciating [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:24+00:00 August 15th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Dissociation, Dissociative Disorders & The Therapeutic Relationship

Healing of Affect Dysregulation & Dissociation with the therapeutic relationship

The concept of dissociation has a long history of bridging psychiatry, psychology, and neurology. Because dissociation is inextricably linked to trauma, theoretical and clinical models of dissociation have spanned the psycho- logical and biological realms. Although the relationship between childhood trauma and dissociation was noted at the end of the 19th century, only recently has a developmental perspective been used to understand dissocia- tion’s etiological mechanisms. Dissociative phenomena are now being viewed through an interdisciplinary lens. There is a growing appreciation of the unique contributions that developmental models can make to psychopathogenesis. As Putnam (1995) noted, a developmental view of dissociation offers “potentially very rich models for understanding the ontogeny of environmentally produced psychiatric conditions” (p. 582). In particular, I will suggest that regulation theory (Schore, 1994, 2003a, 2003b) can provide such models. Towards that end I will draw upon (1) recent ndings about infant behavior from developmental psychology, (2) current data on brain development from neuroscience, (3) updated basic research in biological psychiatry on stress mechanisms, and (4) new information from developmental psychobiology on the essential functions of the autonomic nervous system in order to construct a model of the etiology and underly- ing psychoneurobiological mechanisms of pathological dissociation. I will use posttraumatic stress disorder as a paradigm for dissociative disorder. I will discuss the earliest expression of dissociation in human infancy— pediatric posttraumatic stress disorder—and its enduring impact on the experience-dependent maturation of the right brain, including the characterological use of disso- ciation at later points of interpersonal stress. Dissociation and the Dissociative Disorders is defined by DSM-IV as “a disruption in the usually integrated functions of consciousness, memory, identity, or perception of the environment” (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) and by the 10th edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) as “a partial or complete loss of the [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:25+00:00 August 15th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Healing of Affect Dysregulation & Dissociation with the therapeutic relationship

Learn how to prevent brain and gut related health problems

Dr. Emeran Mayer, professor of medicine and executive director of the UCLA Center for Neurobiology of Stress, offers a revolutionary and provocative look at this developing science, teaching us how to harness the power of the mind-gut connection to take charge of our health and listen to the innate wisdom of our bodies.How the Hidden Conversation Within Our Bodies Impacts Our Mood, Our Choices, and Our Overall Health. Combining cutting-edge neuroscience with the latest discoveries on the human microbiome, a practical guide in the tradition of The Second Brain, and The Good Gut that conclusively demonstrates the inextricable, biological link between mind and the digestive system. We have all experienced the connection between our mind and our gut—the decision we made because it “felt right”; the butterflies in our stomach before a big meeting; the anxious stomach rumbling we get when we’re stressed out. While the dialogue between the gut and the brain has been recognized by ancient healing traditions, including Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine, Western medicine has by and large failed to appreciate the complexity of how the brain, gut, and more recently, the gut microbiota—the microorganisms that live inside our digestive tract—communicate with one another. Dr. Emeran Mayer suggests that consuming a predominantly plant based diet is key for gut and brain health. The Most important Decision anyone can make today is what to put into your body. Learn how to feed your body with the healthiest foods on the planet that you can prepare easily in your own kitchen. Save Money while saving your health and the planet. - Plant Based Academy "Raw vegan food is not boring salads and uncooked vegetables, raw food is a culinary pursuit, a dedication and endeavor to transforming the highest quality of vegetables using simple techniques to extract exquisite flavors, preserving the essential [...]

By | 2019-02-28T11:50:59+00:00 July 21st, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Learn how to prevent brain and gut related health problems

The Neurobiology of stress and the brain- Gut Connection

How the Hidden Conversation Within Our Bodies Impacts Our Mood, Our Choices, and Our Overall Health. Combining cutting-edge neuroscience with the latest discoveries on the human microbiome, a practical guide in the tradition of The Second Brain, and The Good Gut that conclusively demonstrates the inextricable, biological link between mind and the digestive system. We have all experienced the connection between our mind and our gut—the decision we made because it “felt right”; the butterflies in our stomach before a big meeting; the anxious stomach rumbling we get when we’re stressed out. While the dialogue between the gut and the brain has been recognized by ancient healing traditions, including Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine, Western medicine has by and large failed to appreciate the complexity of how the brain, gut, and more recently, the gut microbiota—the microorganisms that live inside our digestive tract—communicate with one another. In The Mind-Gut Connection, Dr. Emeran Mayer, professor of medicine and executive director of the UCLA Center for Neurobiology of Stress, offers a revolutionary and provocative look at this developing science, teaching us how to harness the power of the mind-gut connection to take charge of our health and listen to the innate wisdom of our bodies.   The Mind-Gut Connection describes:   ∙ Why consuming a predominantly plant-based diet is key for gut and brain health. ∙ The importance of early childhood in gut-brain development. . What parents can do to help their children thrive in gut - brain development. . The role of excessive stress and anxiety in GI ailments and cognitive disorders. . How to “listen to your gut” and pay attention to the signals your body is sending you and much more.      

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:26+00:00 July 20th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on The Neurobiology of stress and the brain- Gut Connection

Corrective Emotional Experience with a Therapist

The only way to heal our wounds is to expose them, to bring them to the light. When the longing to be free is bigger than the fear of being exposed, we open ourselves to experiences that re-program our deepest beliefs about ourselves. This deep process work helps you to look at emotional incidents from the past in order to liberate the flow of energy held in dysfunctional psychological behavior patterns. We aim to create an atmosphere in which love and awareness surround and support you, allowing you to drop layers of protection which are no longer needed, release suppressed energy and return to your essence, redirecting the energy once used for protection, to engage in rich human experiences -Trauma Recovery Institute  Trauma Recovery Institute offers unparalleled services and treatment approach. Trauma Recovery Institute provides unique individual and group psychotherapy specialising in personality disorders, complex trauma & neglect, sexual trauma, chronic illness and relationship difficulties. We also offer specialised group psychotherapy for psychotherapists and psychotherapy students, People struggling with addictions and substance abuse, sexual abuse survivors, people suffering with cancer or recovering from cancer and their family members, Parents exploring the art of conscious parenting and people looking to function in life at a higher level. Trauma recovery Institute offers a very safe supportive space for deep relational work with highly skilled and experienced psychotherapists accredited with Irish Group Psychotherapy Society (IGPS), which holds the highest accreditation standard in Europe. Trauma Recovery Institute uses a highly structured relationship and body focused psychotherapeutic approach called Dynamic Psychosocialsomatic Psychotherapy (DPP). To explore our unique approach come in for an initial consultation by filling out the form below.     Dynamic Psychosocialsomatic Psychotheyapy (DPP) Dynamic Psychosocialsomatic Psychotherapy (DPP) is a highly structured, once to twice weekly-modified psychodynamic treatment based on the psychoanalytic model [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:27+00:00 July 19th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Corrective Emotional Experience with a Therapist

Couples in Conflict & The Unconscious Contract

When we meet our partners, we make an unconscious contract to help each other resolve emotional injuries of the past , we unconsciously pick or hire the perfect person to trigger this stored painful memory of our past , it is for this exact reason we have come together . Relationships are not a problem to be solved but an adventure to be embraced. Conflict is a gift to be unpacked , to embrace, an opportunity to grow , resolve and mature . Conflict can not be resolved at the level with which it was created. We hire the person in our life who is most compatible to help us resolve what is unresolved from our childhood. Our relationship lives in the space between us and it is sacred . This becomes the playground for our children . When there are only two options , take the third option ! Keep the space between you safe and sacred . Honour the space between you , by visiting the other by crossing the bridge . Cross the bridge with an open mind to learn , with curiosity and compassion , leave behind your hurt and trauma. Crossing the bridge is becoming completely present with your partner, listening without interruption, defensiveness or judgement, holding an unconditional space for your partner to share.   Beyond right thinking and Beyond wrong thinking there is a field , I will meet you there - This is the third option   Seven principles for conscious relationships 1. The relationship lives in the space between us. 2. The emotional charged part of your partner is the child in them trying to tell their story , allow each other to tell that story by crossing the bridge. 3. We are energy that can be positive and negative , be aware of [...]

By | 2017-12-01T12:54:27+00:00 July 18th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Couples in Conflict & The Unconscious Contract

How you Connect Emotionally is how you Connect Sexually

The New Science of Romantic Love: Love is the continual search for a basic, secure connection with someone else. Through this bond, partners in love become emotionally dependent on each other for nurturing, soothing, and protection. We have a wired-in need for emotional contact and responsiveness from significant others. It's a survival response, the driving force of the bond of security a baby seeks with its mother. This observation is at the heart of attachment theory. A great deal of evidence indicates that the need for secure attachment never disappears; it evolves into the adult need for a secure emotional bond with a partner. Think of how a mother lovingly gazes at her baby, just as two lovers stare into each other's eyes. Although our culture has framed dependency as a bad thing, a weakness, it is not. Being attached to someone provides our greatest sense of security and safety. It means depending on a partner to respond when you call, to know that you matter to him or her, that you are cherished, and that he will respond to your emotional needs. The most basic tenet of attachment theory is that isolation—not just physical isolation but emotional isolation—is traumatizing for human beings. The brain actually codes it as danger. The drama of love is all about the human hunger for safe emotional connection, a survival imperative we experience from the cradle to the grave. Once we do feel safely linked with our partner, we can tolerate the hurts they will—inevitably—inflict upon us in the course of daily life.   Hold Me Tight - Broken connections Love demands the reassurance of touch. Most fights are really protests over emotional disconnection. Underneath the distress, partners are desperate to know: Are you there for me? We start out intensely connected to and responsive to our partners. But [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:14+00:00 July 14th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on How you Connect Emotionally is how you Connect Sexually

The Seven Deadly Realtional Fears

The Seven Deadly Fears can be thought of as disturbances of childhood in the Lowenian sense in that they set up characteristic blocks to spontaneous, creative, and vibrant living and loving. Each of these character blocks can be thought of as intimately linked with body function and structure at various developmental levels in the same manner that Lowen has demonstrated in his extensive work on character types. Each set of character blocks generated by childhood fear can also be expected to manifest in relationships—especially the psychotherapeutic one—as resistance to relating in a fully alive manner in the "here-and-now" of the present moment. Seven Deadly Fears thus outlines not only seven distinctly different kinds of fears produced by different kinds of childhood relationship situations. Each general fear is assumed to be specifically tied to certain kinds of misattuned environmental responsiveness to the child's changing developmental capacities and needs at different stages of development. The crucial technical implication in conceptualizing seven developmental levels of fear-based character formations is that optimal listening in psychotherapy then requires that we respond to each developmental level with different ways of understanding the transference, the resistance, and the countertransference.   1. The Fear of Being Alone We dread reaching out and finding nobody there to respond to our needs. We fear being ignored, being left alone, and being seen as unimportant. We feel the world does not respond to our needs. So what's the use?   2. The Fear of Connecting Because of frightening and painful experiences in the past, connecting emotionally and intimately with others feels dangerous. Our life experiences have left us feeling that the world is not a safe place. We fear injury so we withdraw from connections.   3. The Fear of Being abandoned After having connected emotionally or bonded with someone, we [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:14+00:00 July 14th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on The Seven Deadly Realtional Fears

Clinical Director – Darren Maguire

“To Exist is to Change, To change is to Mature, To mature is to go on creating one’s self endlessly – Henri Bergson   Darren Maguire M.I.G.P.S is the founding director of Life Change Health Institute, where he currently serves as clinical director and functional health psychologist. He is in private practice specializing in complex trauma and personality disorders with Trauma Recovery Institute. Trauma Recovery Institute offers unparalleled services and treatment approach through unique individual and group psychotherapy, Specialising in long-term relational trauma recovery, sexual trauma recovery and early childhood trauma recovery. The Institute also offers specialized group psychotherapy for psychotherapists and psychotherapy students, People struggling with addictions and substance abuse, sexual abuse survivors and people looking to function in life at a higher level. Trauma recovery Institute offers a very safe supportive space for deep relational work with highly skilled and experienced psychotherapists accredited with Irish Group Psychotherapy Society (IGPS), which holds the highest accreditation standard in Europe. Darren is a Plantrician and Psychobiotic expert specializing in alternative holistic treatment of chronic disease and autoimmune disorders. Darren holds a number of appointments such as dance facilitator at Tantric Dance & Ecstatic Movement School, plant based chef & lecturer at Plant Based Academy, embodied tantra & relationship coach at Embodied Tantra Ireland and conscious parenting educator at Conscious Parenting Ireland. Darren has dedicated the last 15 years studying the impact of traumatic stress and its role in emotional and physical syndromes and diseases. Darren has developed a unique multidiscipline approach to body mind medicine called Dynamic Psychosocialsomatic Psychotherapy (DPP). This approach is an integrative treatment approach for working with complex trauma, borderline personality organization and dissociation. This treatment approach attempts to address the root causes of trauma-based presentations and fragmentation, seeking to help the client heal early experiences of abandonment, neglect, trauma, [...]

By | 2018-03-22T16:43:30+00:00 July 13th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Clinical Director – Darren Maguire

The Dark Side of Ecstatic Dance & Embodied Disembodiment

Eventually, any belief, strategy, philosophy or dogma – whether intellectually supported or emotionally attached to – becomes the places where we stick, the caged structures that encase us. We become mentally fixated and immobile as inertia sets in: change becomes unthinkable, so we need methods to actively outsmart this tendency to be dogmatic.   “We use our minds not to discover facts but to hide them. One of things the screen hides most effectively is the body, our own body, by which I mean, the ins and outs of it, its interiors. Like a veil thrown over the skin to secure its modesty, the screen partially removes from the mind the inner states of the body, those that constitute the flow of life as it wanders in the journey of each day. The elusiveness of emotions and feelings is probably . . . an indication of how we cover to the presentation of our bodies, how much mental imagery masks the reality of the body” – Damasio   Healing through Dance Alone is not Enough Dance is an amazingly powerful healing platform, it can be about fun, healing, moving, connecting, meditation and expression. People dance for many many reasons, Many people also choose dance as a body based form of therapy to help deal with or heal from life challenges past and present. Many people who have experinced some form of trauma use dance as a way to recover or deal with what has happened. Effective treatment for trauma needs to involve (1) learning to tolerate feelings and sensations by increasing the capacity for interoception, (2) learning to modulate arousal, and (3) learning that after confrontation with physical helplessness it is essential to engage in taking effective action. Introception is the process of embodied mindfulness, and in neuroscientific terms it is [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:15+00:00 July 5th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on The Dark Side of Ecstatic Dance & Embodied Disembodiment

What is 5Rhythms Dance

The 5Rhythms comprise a simple movement practice designed to release the dancer that lives in everybody, no matter what its shape, size, age, limitations and experience. To find your dance is to find yourself, at you’re most fluid and creative level. While the practice itself is the essence of simplicity, it has the power to catalyze deep healing and creative expression. The primary teaching of this work is: If you put the psyche in motion, it will heal itself. To start with, the music for flowing should be slowish, grounded, internal – allowing you to let the dance in and connect with yourself. For staccato, find something with a beat that will let your hips groove and the breath out. For chaos, the top of the wave, something faster, something to shake out to and let it all go. In lyrical the music could be light, joyous, trancey. And ending in stillness…its a moving stillness so choose music that has the spirit of stillness within it – sometimes classical music can be beautiful to dance too. These 5 Rhythms come together to create the Wave, a movement meditation practice. Rather than having steps to follow, each rhythms is a different energy field in which you find your own expression and choreography, thereby stretching your imagination as well as your body. Each rhythm is a teacher, and you can expect to meet different and sometimes unknown aspects of yourself as your dance unfolds and your practice of the rhythms deepens over time.   "I have come to drag you out of yourself and take you in my heart I have come to bring out the beauty you never know you had and lift you like a prayer to the sky." ~Rumi           Flowing,  Earth, Let it in, Receptive, Fluid, [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:15+00:00 July 4th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on What is 5Rhythms Dance

Reconsidering Psychotherapy

Trauma Recovery Institute offers unparalleled services and treatment approach. Trauma Recovery Institute provides unique individual and group psychotherapy specialising in personality disorders, complex trauma & neglect, sexual trauma, chronic illness and relationship difficulties. We also offer specialised group psychotherapy for psychotherapists and psychotherapy students, People struggling with addictions and substance abuse, sexual abuse survivors, people suffering with cancer or recovering from cancer and their family members, Parents exploring the art of conscious parenting and people looking to function in life at a higher level. Trauma recovery Institute offers a very safe supportive space for deep relational work with highly skilled and experienced psychotherapists accredited with Irish Group Psychotherapy Society (IGPS), which holds the highest accreditation standard in Europe. Trauma Recovery Institute uses a highly structured relationship and body focused psychotherapeutic approach called Dynamic Psychosocialsomatic Psychotherapy (DPP). To explore our unique approach come in for an initial consultation by filling out the form below.   Dynamic Psychosocialsomatic Psychotheyapy (DPP) Dynamic Psychosocialsomatic Psychotherapy (DPP) is a highly structured, once to twice weekly-modified psychodynamic treatment based on the psychoanalytic model of object relations. This approach is also informed by the latest in neuroscience, interpersonal neurobiology and attachment theory. As with traditional psychodynamic psychotherapy relationship takes a central role within the treatment and the exploration of internal relational dyads. Our approach differs in that also central to the treatment is the focus on the transference and countertransference, an awareness of shifting bodily states in the present moment and a focus on the client’s external relationships, emotional life and lifestyle. Dynamic Psychosocialsomatic Psychotherapy (DPP) is an integrative treatment approach for working with complex trauma, borderline personality organization and dissociation. This treatment approach attempts to address the root causes of trauma-based presentations and fragmentation, seeking to help the client heal early experiences of abandonment, neglect, trauma, [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:16+00:00 July 2nd, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Reconsidering Psychotherapy

Spiritual Bypassing & The Dark Side of Conscious Sexuality

Spiritual bypassing, a term first coined by psychologist John Welwood in 1984, is the use of spiritual practices and beliefs to avoid dealing with our painful feelings, unresolved wounds, and developmental needs. It is much more common than we might think and, in fact, is so pervasive as to go largely unnoticed, except in its more obvious extremes. Part of the reason for this is that we tend not to have very much tolerance, both personally and collectively, for facing, entering, and working through our pain, strongly preferring pain-numbing “solutions,” regardless of how much suffering such “remedies” may catalyze. Because this preference has so deeply and thoroughly infiltrated our culture that it has become all but normalized, spiritual bypassing fits almost seamlessly into our collective habit of turning away from what is painful, as a kind of higher analgesic with seemingly minimal side effects. It is a spiritualized strategy not only for avoiding pain but also for legitimizing such avoidance, in ways ranging from the blatantly obvious to the extremely subtle. Spiritual bypassing is a very persistent shadow of spirituality, manifesting in many ways, often without being acknowledged as such. Aspects of spiritual bypassing include exaggerated detachment, emotional numbing and repression, overemphasis on the positive, anger-phobia, blind or overly tolerant compassion, weak or too porous boundaries, lopsided development (cognitive intelligence often being far ahead of emotional and moral intelligence), debilitating judgment about one’s negativity or shadow elements, devaluation of the personal relative to the spiritual, and delusions of having arrived at a higher level of being. The explosion of interest in spirituality, especially Eastern spirituality, since the mid-1960s has been accompanied by a corresponding interest and immersion in spiritual bypassing—which has, however, not very often been named, let alone viewed, as such. It has been easier to frame spiritual bypassing as [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:16+00:00 July 2nd, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Spiritual Bypassing & The Dark Side of Conscious Sexuality

Conscious Sexuality & Creating Wild Passion and Intimacy by Michaela Boehm

Intimate relationships are our universities of the heart. In them we will find challenges and blessings, ecstasy and sorrows, and come to realise that our lovers are our mirrors and we are reflected in their eyes. If there is conflict in our relationships it is because we ourselves are in conflict; if there is joy and fulfillment it is because we have found peace within ourselves. ~Ross Haven   What is tantra? Tantra as it is seen in the West is very different from the original ways it was practiced. It is essentially a tradition in which awakening is pursued through embodiment (vs. disembodiment in meditation, etc.) and union is sought through relationship and intimacy. In the West it has been mostly pursued for its emphasis on using sexual union as one of the vehicles to awakening (enlightenment). In reality, only a small portion of tantra has anything to do with sex, and only as a way to merge with the divine. There is a much larger tantric discipline that deals with allowing all feelings to be met with equal acceptance, and for each person to become deeply sensitive to what they are feeling. Subsequently, they are then able to feel others and their needs. Tantra Sessions are individualized depending on what the person or couple needs. Both in sessions and workshops there is no sexually explicit touching, no nudity and strict rules to ensure safety and maximum freedom in applying the techniques used. All the practices I teach are energetic in nature and can be done fully clothed. In personal sessions I might give the couple homework and assignments. In workshops I teach how to create intimacy and how to revive or increase sexual chemistry. Many people have traumatic, habitual, societal or other closures in their body that prevent them [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:18+00:00 July 2nd, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Conscious Sexuality & Creating Wild Passion and Intimacy by Michaela Boehm

Individual & Group Psychotherapy at Trauma Recovery Institute

Trauma Recovery Institute offers unparalleled services and treatment approach. Trauma Recovery Institute provides unique individual and group psychotherapy specialising in personality disorders, complex trauma & neglect, sexual trauma, chronic illness and relationship difficulties. We also offer specialised group psychotherapy for psychotherapists and psychotherapy students, People struggling with addictions and substance abuse, sexual abuse survivors, people suffering with cancer or recovering from cancer and their family members, Parents exploring the art of conscious parenting and people looking to function in life at a higher level. Trauma recovery Institute offers a very safe supportive space for deep relational work with highly skilled and experienced psychotherapists accredited with Irish Group Psychotherapy Society (IGPS), which holds the highest accreditation standard in Europe. Trauma Recovery Institute uses a highly structured relationship and body focused psychotherapeutic approach called Dynamic Psychosocialsomatic Psychotherapy (DPP). To explore our unique approach come in for an initial consultation by filling out the form below.   Dynamic Psychosocialsomatic Psychotheyapy (DPP) Dynamic Psychosocialsomatic Psychotherapy (DPP) is a highly structured, once to twice weekly-modified psychodynamic treatment based on the psychoanalytic model of object relations. This approach is also informed by the latest in neuroscience, interpersonal neurobiology and attachment theory. As with traditional psychodynamic psychotherapy relationship takes a central role within the treatment and the exploration of internal relational dyads. Our approach differs in that also central to the treatment is the focus on the transference and countertransference, an awareness of shifting bodily states in the present moment and a focus on the client’s external relationships, emotional life and lifestyle. Dynamic Psychosocialsomatic Psychotherapy (DPP) is an integrative treatment approach for working with complex trauma, borderline personality organization and dissociation. This treatment approach attempts to address the root causes of trauma-based presentations and fragmentation, seeking to help the client heal early experiences of abandonment, neglect, trauma, [...]

By | 2018-01-15T12:55:08+00:00 June 29th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Individual & Group Psychotherapy at Trauma Recovery Institute

The Art of Conscious Loving with Embodied Tantra Ireland

Intimate relationships are our universities of the heart. In them we will find challenges and blessings, ecstasy and sorrows, and come to realise that our lovers are our mirrors and we are reflected in their eyes. If there is conflict in our relationships it is because we ourselves are in conflict; if there is joy and fulfillment it is because we have found peace within ourselves. ~Ross Haven   The Art of Conscious Loving Tantra Coaching with Psychotherapist Darren Maguire. The Art of Conscious Loving is a dive into somatic sexology and embodied tantra within a framework of dynamic psychosocialsomatic psychotherapy. This is dynamic experiential work exploring how we show up in relationships, what we bring to relationships, our unconscious patterns, how residual stress and trauma impact our love life and how to create a conscious loving practise. Embodied Tantra is living with an awareness in the moment through the body in an intimate connection with self, others and all that is. This allows you to have more choice, and to access more of what you are capable of, including pleasure, love, Intimacy and healthy attachments. Embodied Tantra groups and workshops are very powerful , safe, empowering, informative, psychoeducational, psychotherapeutic and liberating. Embodied Tantra is suitable for people at all levels including complete beginners of Tantra practise. Embodied Tantra is a dive deeper, a tantra workshop with difference, where not only will you learn tools for living intimately but get an opportunity to work through any blocks you have to intimacy and is perfect for anybody looking to create a healthy relationship with strong boundaries, communication, intimacy, connection, love, happiness and passionate love making. The word “somatic” comes from the Greek word “somatikos”, meaning living, aware, of the body. Somatics recognizes that the body and mind are not separate entities. They [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:19+00:00 June 28th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on The Art of Conscious Loving with Embodied Tantra Ireland

The Role of Healthy Relational Interactions in Buffering the Impact of Childhood Trauma

Humans are social creatures. We live, work, and grow up in social groups. For the vast majority of the last 200,000 years, humans have lived in multigenerational, multifamily hunter-gatherer bands characterized by a rich and continuous relational milieu; the concept of personal space and privacy is relatively new. Child mortality during our history was high; children were highly valued by the band and in these groups of 40–60 members, there were roughly four developmentally more mature potential caregivers for each child under the age of 6. This enriched relational ratio helped the group protect, nurture, educate, and enrich the lives of each developing child. These living groups were the source of safety and sustenance for individuals in a dangerous world. Survival depended upon the ability to communicate, bond, and share with and receive from other members of the band. Then, as today, the presence of familiar people projecting the social–emotional cues of acceptance, understanding, compassion, and empathy calmed the stress response of the individual. We feel safest in the presence of familiar and nurturing members of our family and community. These powerful regulating effects of healthy relational interac- tions on the individual—mediated by various key neural networks in the brain—are at the core of relationally based protective mechanisms that help us survive and thrive following trauma and loss. Individuals who have few positive relational interactions—a child without a healthy family/clan—during or after trauma have a much more dif cult time decreasing the trauma-induced activation of the stress response systems. The result is an increased probability of developing trauma-related prob- lems. Further, children in a relationally impoverished setting will likely be unable to recover or heal from these effects without a change in the relational milieu. Positive relational interactions regulate the brain’s stress response systems and help create positive and healing neuroendo- [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:19+00:00 June 27th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on The Role of Healthy Relational Interactions in Buffering the Impact of Childhood Trauma

Right-Brain Affect Regulation An Essential Mechanism of Development, Trauma, Dissociation, and Psychotherapy

There is currently an increasing awareness, indeed a palpable sense, that a number of clinical disciplines are undergoing a significant transformation, a paradigm shift. A powerful engine for the increased energy and growth in the mental health field is our ongoing dialogue with neighboring disciplines, es- pecially developmental science, biology, and neuroscience. This mutually en- riching interdisciplinary communication is centered on a common interest in the primacy of affect in the human condition. Psychological studies on the critical role of emotional contact between humans are now being integrated with biological studies on the impact of these relational interactions on brain systems that regulate emotional bodily based survival functions. By definition, a paradigm shift occurs simultaneously across a number of different fields, and it induces an increased dialogue between the clinical and applied sciences. This transdisciplinary shift is articulated by Richard Ryan in a recent editorial of the journal Motivation and Emotion: After three decades of the dominance of cognitive approaches, motivation- al and emotional processes have roared back into the limelight. . . . More practically, cognitive interventions that do not address motivation and emo- tion are increasingly proving to be short-lived in their efficacy, and limited in the problems to which they can be applied.  Echoing this perspective, the neuroscientist Jaak Panksepp now boldly asserts: "The cognitive revolution, like radical neuro-behaviorism, intentionally sought to put emotions out of sight and out of mind. Now cognitive science must re-learn that ancient emotional systems have a power that is quite independent of neocortical cognitive processes. . . . These emotional sub- strates promote cognitive–object relations, optimally through rich emotional experiences." And in the psychotherapy literature Karen Maroda sets forth this challenge: "From my experience there are more therapists who have painfully sat on their emotions, erroneously believing that they were doing the right thing. [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:20+00:00 June 20th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Right-Brain Affect Regulation An Essential Mechanism of Development, Trauma, Dissociation, and Psychotherapy

Embodied Self Awareness – Rediscovering the lost art of sensing the body

Recent research into the physiological and neurological impact of touch-based therapies has created a surge of interest in the body as an appropriate resource for psychological well-being. The body is now recognized as inextricably linked to our thoughts, emotions, and unconscious selves. Fogel’s extensive research as a developmental psychologist and his clinical practice of a modality developed by Marion Rosen, Rosen Method Bodywork, led to his interest and subsequent research into ‘Embodied Self-Awareness.’ Embodied Self-Awareness (ESA) is a core concept of the Rosen Method somatic approach to whole-person integration which employs original touch and dialogue techniques to contact the unconscious through the body. The specific qualities that identify Embodied Self-Awareness make it an important tool of value to those working with clients suffering from trauma or prolonged stress. Alan fogel has published neuroscientific research showing conclusively that Embodied Self-Awareness offers an avenue for self healing and reparation that sustains as well as repairs the parts of us damaged or closed down through trauma, stress, difficult experiences and lack of self awareness. Moreover the range of benefits associated with ESA make it attractive to those who wish to explore human potential without having a ‘problem’ or ‘pain’ to prompt their curiosity. Such clients value the resource of ESA for enhancing and expanding their emotional and physical well- being rather than looking to be ‘ fixed’. Embodied Self- Awareness also offers benefits that are in some way comparable to mindfulness for the body, acting as a form of preventative healthcare for those who believe that prevention is preferable to cure. Both clients and practitioners experience a quality of ESA different to that tolerated in everyday life. This is because the level of relaxation and awareness in the practitioner needs to be sufficiently authentic to invite the autonomic response in the client. Both are ‘touched’ by [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:21+00:00 June 20th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Embodied Self Awareness – Rediscovering the lost art of sensing the body

Tantra Coaching and Psychotherapy for working with difficulties in Sex, Intimacy and Relationships

Learn how to be fully alive, fully present with a rich connection with self and your partner, this allows for the richest of human experiences. Learn effective communication skills, and “dissolve” relationship problems created by affairs, projections, past traumas and attachment difficulties. We belive that the relationship is not broken but is a mirror of what needs to be resolved within ourselves and within our relationships. Our relationship coaching approach is based on Imago therapy, encounter centered couples therapy and dynamic psychosocialsomatic psychotherapy. A Tantra coaching session results in re-connection, restores compassion, forgiveness and intimacy, teaches how to make authentic mutual amends, and rebuilds mutual trust for a new future together. Our tantra coaching sessions are suitable for single people, individuals from challenging relationships and for couples. Tantra coaching for working through difficulties with sex, intimacy and relationships, empowering you to thrive in love, sexuality and intimacy. Embodied Tantra is living with an awareness in the moment through the body in an intimate connection with self, others and all that is. This allows you to have more choice, and to access more of what you are capable of, including pleasure, love, Intimacy and healthy attachments. Tantra coaching is safe, empowering, informative, psychoeducational, psychotherapeutic and liberating. Tantra coaching is also an opportunity to work through any blocks you have to intimacy and is perfect for anybody looking to create a healthy relationship with strong boundaries, communication, intimacy, connection, love, happiness and passion. "Tantra is not technique but prayer. Is not head oriented but a relaxation into the heart. Please remember it. Many books have been written onTantra, they all talk about technique but the real Tantra has nothing to do with technique. The real Tantra cannot be written about, the real Tantra has to be imbibed(absorbed). How to imbibe real Tantra? [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:22+00:00 June 16th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Tantra Coaching and Psychotherapy for working with difficulties in Sex, Intimacy and Relationships

The Power of Breathing & Self Regulation in Psychotherapy

  "If in childhood a certain quality of expression such as anger cannot be felt or experienced, then we cannot relate to this expression in a patient." - David Wallin This is a right-brain-to-right-brain connection—what Allan Schore calls "implicit nonverbal affect-laden communication [that] directly represents the attachment dynamic . . . nonverbal primary process clinical intuition." At the same time, the therapist must maintain a left-brain-to-left-brain connection with the client in order to co-create a coherent narrative about the client's unarticulated, even formerly undefined, emotional experience. Therapists need "binocular vision," says Wallin, to keep "one eye on the patient, and one eye on ourselves." In fact, the therapist may need something like "triocular" vision as he tries to be in the client's mind, in his own mind, and in between the two minds, establishing and maintaining between himself and the client mutually resonant affective, cognitive, and physical states of being. The therapist isn't just an observer of the client's emotional journey or even a disinterested guide, but a fellow traveler, resonating with the client's sadness, anger, and anxiety. Rather than recoiling from the intensity of the client's experience, the therapist is providing—through voice tone, eye contact, expression, posture, as well as words—the stability, the ballast, so to speak, to keep the client feeling not only understood, but safely held and supported. Obviously this kind of demanding work, more than some other modalities, requires therapists to have their own inner act together. "We are the tools of our trade, the primary creative instrument with which we do the work," says California clinical psychologist David Wallin, author of Attachment in Psychotherapy. The insecurely attached infant never got the maternal neural imprinting that would help her learn to regulate her own nervous system, thus making her susceptible to uncontrollable storms of inconvenient and [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:23+00:00 June 11th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on The Power of Breathing & Self Regulation in Psychotherapy

Becoming Healthy & Breaking Those Junk Food Addictions at Plant Based Academy

Learn how to be healthy and thrive, raw vegan food and eating healthy is not about depravation, it is not about extremes; it is not about yoyo dieting and fad diets. Eating healthy is incredibly easy and when you feel better than you have ever felt in your life regardless of age or the level of stress in your life, it becomes impossible to go backwards. Junk food often tastes great because it is designed to do so by adding enormous amounts of salt, sugar or oil and certain chemical additives. These products and foods are designed for large food companies to make huge money while you get sick and sicker, not feeling well often encourages you to eat more of this kind of food in an attempt to feel better or for stimulation, setting up addictions to certain foods and then depending on medicines to counteract the symptoms of eating such foods. This leads to a dependency on junk food and medicines. This does not happen by accident, in all major food and medicine manufactures, psychologists are hired to market their products. Eating healthy is about making informed choices. Healthy food can be extremely delicious too; it can taste sweet and salty too and is extremely satisfying without the adverse side effects, addiction, weight gain and subsequent illness. Simply put, eating that level of sugar, salt, oil and chemicals in junk foods along with their deficiency in essential nutrients, antioxidants and minerals will absolutely without any doubt impact your immune system and gut which eventually can lead to a host of all known illnesses such as heart attacks, cancer, diabetes and autoimmune disorders. Make informed choices today, break your food addictions, invest in your future health and wellbeing, invest in your family future, learn how to create amazing, tasty, [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:23+00:00 June 11th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Becoming Healthy & Breaking Those Junk Food Addictions at Plant Based Academy

The connection between stress, poor attachments and health

The Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study is one of the largest investigations ever conducted to assess associations between childhood maltreatment and later-life health and well-being. The study is a collaboration between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Kaiser Permanente's Health Appraisal Clinic in San Diego. More than 17,000 Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) members undergoing a comprehensive physical examination chose to provide detailed information about their childhood experience of abuse, neglect, and family dysfunction. To date, more than 50 scientific articles have been published and more than100 conference and workshop presentations have been made. The ACE Study findings suggest that certain experiences are major risk factors for the leading causes of illness and death as well as poor quality of life in the United States. Neglect, physical abuse, custodial interference and sexual abuse are types of child maltreatment that can lead to poor physical and mental health well into adulthood. It is critical to understand how some of the worst health and social problems in our nation can arise as a consequence of adverse childhood experiences. Realizing these connections is likely to improve efforts towards prevention and recovery. If you are suffering with an illness or addiction, finding relationships challenging, attracting the wrong people into your life, continously falling in love with an emotionally unavailable partners, struggling with porn, sex & love addictions, or struggling to find joy in life. There is a very high possibility that you have suffered adverse childhood experiences regardless of how covert they may seem and when left unresolved can manifest in a host of life challenges with Money, Sex, relationships, mental Health, emotional health and physical health. It is important to note that working through early childhood adverse experiences is not about blaming parents, and does not have to mean talking for long [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:24+00:00 June 9th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on The connection between stress, poor attachments and health

Music Therapy & Trauma:Insights from the Polyvagal Theory

Music is an important component of the human experience. The use of music in culture has been a documented feature of the history of civilizations. Types of music have been uniquely associated with distinct feelings, experiences, and social interactions. Cultures have incorporated music into the educational process, religious and tribal rituals, and patriotic expressions. Music conveys features of culture both with lyrics and melody. Vocal music has been used both as a contemporary vehicle and an archival mechanism to transmit important cultural, moral, spiritual, and historical events and values. Music has been used to calm, to enable feelings of safety, and to reduce the social distance between people. Music is intertwined with emotions, affect regulation, and interpersonal social behavior and other psychological processes that describe basic human experiences in response to environmental, interpersonal, and even intrapersonal challenges. These psychological processes shape our sense of self, contribute to our abilities to form relationships, and determine whether we feel safe in various contexts or with specific people. Although these processes can be objectively observed and subjectively described, they represent a complex interplay between our psychological experience and our physiology. This chapter will provide a novel insight into the traditions of music as a therapy aiding physical and mental health. Music therapy is more than listening to music or singing or playing a musical instrument. Music therapy involves active interactions among three features: 1) therapist, 2) client, and 3) music. In the following pages, the Polyvagal Theory will be used to present a plausible model to explain how and why music therapy would be helpful in supporting physical health and in enhancing function during compromised states associated with mental and physical illness including the consequences of trauma. The Polyvagal Theory provides a strategy to understand the mechanisms and processes that enable music and [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:25+00:00 May 31st, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Music Therapy & Trauma:Insights from the Polyvagal Theory

Sex addiction, love , lust and anger

Sex is one of the most powerful forces in the human condition. It can drive individuals to the pinnacle of emotional and physical ecstasy or, conversely, spiral other people into depths of despair and anguish. The power of sexual energy and expression exists because our sexuality is tied, or connected, to the core of who we are; it is our essence, our life force, our creativity, and our passion. A sense of self means an inner knowing, clarity of our true nature or authenticity. In healthy sexual expression, there is desire, connection, and a sense of well-being. The act of expressing one’s self sexually results in a positive, life-enhancing experience; it is an expression of love, an exchange of mutual pleasuring and respect that leads to an intimate connection. The sexual compulsive person may think this is what he or she is experiencing. However, the opposite is true. Sex for the addict is about intensity, danger, power, and control. It is about emotional numbing, conquering, and getting high. Sex becomes a commodity to be manipulated, a means to a self-defeating end. Sex and love become a game to play, avoidance, a push/pull, or a hunger so powerful that the addict will risk everything to reach that sexual high. No risk or consequence has stopped the addict: disease, financial ruin, lost relationships, legal injunctions, career setbacks, or self-respect. The addict is caught in an intoxicating dance that has induced a delusional reality. This is the cycle of sex addiction, and it is deadly—not always in physical form, but most assuredly in emotional experience. This “soul” death is temporarily allayed when the addict is on the “hunt” for sex or, at the other extreme, is avoiding sex at all costs. At either end of the spectrum, the addict feels in control and powerful. This [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:25+00:00 May 30th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Sex addiction, love , lust and anger

Integrating somatic psychotherapy, attachment theory, neuroscience, object relations and Mindfullness

In the following text we will examine the potential mechanisms underlying the well- documented, complex relationships between maltreatment in childhood and the subsequent development of psychopathology. Thousands of studies over the last fifty years have described various aspects of these relationships. Maltreatment in childhood increases risk for virtually every DSM-IV disorder, from autistic-spectrum disorders to schizophrenia to ADHD to major depression to substance abuse disorders. The mechanisms underlying this maltreatment related increase in risk of neuropsychiatric problems are undetermined. The key question addressed in this chapter is “How can abuse lead to psychopathology?” The perspective of the present chapter is neurodevelopmental. This “lens” provides significant insight about the sometimes confusing interrelationships between psychopathology, DSM-IV “diagnoses” and developmental trauma or neglect. A neurodevelopmental perspective is meant to compliment other theoretical and experimental views and can provide useful clues to the mechanisms underlying the origins of neuropsychiatric problems. The primary premise of a neurodevelopmental perspective is that the human brain is the organ mediating all emotional, social, cognitive and behavioral functioning. Neuropsychiatric disorders and psychopathology, therefore, must involve altered functioning of systems in the brain. The specific nature of dysfunction (e.g., anxiety vs inattention vs affect regulation vs thought disorder) will be determined by which neural networks and brain areas are altered. The present chapter provides an overview of key neurodevelopmental processes and important neural networks which are impacted by abuse and suggests mechanisms which may underlie neuropsychiatric problems related to developmental maltreatment. The major conclusion of this chapter is that we can make plausible conclusions regarding the effects of abuse if we understand how these experiences impact the developing brain. Simply stated childhood trauma will result in alterations in the systems in the brain which mediate the stress response and neglect will result in dysfunctions in the neural systems which do not [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:26+00:00 May 28th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Integrating somatic psychotherapy, attachment theory, neuroscience, object relations and Mindfullness

Trauma and gut related autoimmune disorders

Trauma can be conceptualized as stemming from a failure of the natural physiological activation and hormonal secretions to organize an effective response to threat. Rather than producing a successful fight or flight response the organism becomes immobilized. Probably the best animal model for this phenomenon is that of ‘inescapable shock,” in which creatures are tortured without being unable to do anything to affect the outcome of events. The resulting failure to fight or flight, that is, the physical immobilization (the freeze response), becomes a conditioned behavioral response. In his book, Affect Regulation and the Origin of the Self, Allen Schore has outlined in exquisite detail the psychobiology of early childhood development involving maturation of orbitofrontal and limbic structures based on reciprocal experiences with the caregiver. Dysfunctional associations in this dyadic relationship result in permanent physicochemical and anatomical changes, which have implications for personality development as well as for a wide variety of clinical manifestations. An intimate relationship may exist, with negative child/care giver interaction leading to a state of persisting hypertonicity of the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems that may profoundly affect the arousal state of the developing child. Sustained hyperarousal in these children may markedly affect behavioral and characterological development. Many traumatized children and adults, confronted with chronically overwhelming emotions, lose their capacity to use emotions as guides for effective action. They often do not recognize what they are feeling and fail to mount an appropriate response. This phenomenon is called alexithymia, an inability to identify the meaning of physical sensations and muscle activation. Failure to recognize what is going on causes them to be out of touch with their needs, and, as a consequence, they are unable to take care of them. This inability to correctly identify sensations, emotions, and physical states often extends itself to having difficulty appreciating [...]

By | 2018-11-08T22:06:53+00:00 May 27th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Trauma and gut related autoimmune disorders

Borderline personality disorder, bipolar disorder, depression, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and narcissistic personality disorder: Practical differential diagnosis Otto F. Kernberg, MD Frank E. Yeomans, MD

The challenge of accurate diagnosis remains at the heart of good psychiatric treatment. In the current state of psychiatry, a confluence of forces has increased this challenge for the clinician. These include practical pressures—such as limited time for diagnostic evaluation, the question of what is reimbursed by insurance, and the issue of directing patients to acute treatments—and also trends in nosology, such as the descriptive focus on signs and symptoms in the current official diagnostic system. The authors offer observations that we hope will help clinicians who have to make difficult diagnostic differentiations often under pressured circumstances. The paper is motivated both by the high frequency of diagnostic errors observed under such conditions and also by the belief that considering symptoms in the context of the patient's sense of self, quality of interpersonal relations, and level of functioning over time will help guide the diagnostic process. Dr. Kernberg is Director, Personality Disorders Institute, The New York Presbyterian Hospital, Payne Whitney Westchester; Professor of Psychiatry, Joan and Sanford I. Weill Medical College of Cornell University; and Training and Supervising Analyst, Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research. Dr. Yeoman’s is Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the Weill Medical College of Cornell University; Director of Training at the Personality Disorders Institute at the New York Presbyterian Hospital, Payne Whitney Westchester; and Director of the Personality Studies Institute in New York City. What follows are clinical observations directed to psychiatrists who have to make difficult diagnostic differentiations, often un- der circumstances of pressured time. These differentiations often involve decisions regarding immediate interventions and treatment planning. This article is motivated by the high frequency of diagnostic errors observed under such conditions, an observation that emerges only when the patient is seen under more stable conditions, particularly during more extended evaluation. We shall [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:27+00:00 May 21st, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Borderline personality disorder, bipolar disorder, depression, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and narcissistic personality disorder: Practical differential diagnosis Otto F. Kernberg, MD Frank E. Yeomans, MD

What is Dynamic Psychotherapy

Psychodynamic psychotherapy is a product of the evolution and modernization of psychoanalysis, which originated with the work of Dr. Sigmund Freud in the late nineteenth century. It is one of many types of therapy used by mental health practitioners today. Generally speaking, therapy is both a way of understanding human emotions and of helping people with their relationships and their personal problems. In psychodynamic psychotherapy, specific problems are viewed in the context of the whole person. The mature or rational self that functions more or less successfully in the real world is only a part of the total person. The more immature, irrational, or unconscious self functions silently in the background to produce various symptoms and maladaptive behaviors that often intrude into the person's social life, personal relationships, school or work activities, and physical health. Because of the importance of addressing both the conscious and unconscious parts of the self, a compassionate quest for self- knowledge is seen as the most important key to changing thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, and to living a fuller, more satisfying life. Psychodynamic psychotherapy is based on the insight that our personalities are the result of passing through and solving relationship issues at many developmental stages. At any stage, the way we have reacted to events in our lives may have caused us to get stuck at a certain level of insight or problem solving. While we go ahead and mature satisfactorily, in many ways we may carry within us the parts that didn't have a chance to develop. We can have a mature exterior and be functioning more or less successfully, while internally we may feel vulnerable, confused, depressed, angry, afraid, and childlike. We may not feel able to bounce back from rejection, get past blocks, allow our real feelings to surface, or stay [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:27+00:00 May 10th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on What is Dynamic Psychotherapy

Reclaim your Health on our new 6 week Life Change Program with Plant Based Academy

Reclaim your health on our new 6 week life change program with Plant Based Academy. This 6 week life change program is a comprehensive professional program for weight loss and/or reclaiming your health through our functional health model. The 6 week program will include one psychotherapy session per week for 6 weeks, a comprehensive diet and lifestyle plan for the 6 weeks, an online repair your gut program and a number of other online modules including simple and advanced recipes for healthhy meals, juices and smoothies and a detailed nutritional science guide. Plant Based Academy offers a world unique 5 Step Holistic Approach to Optimum Health which can be used for weight loss, to reverse disease and achieve radiant health, our approach is designed to address the root causes of weight gain and disease rather than simply addressing symptomology. Our 5 Step Holistic Approach to Optimum Health is: 1) Eliminating toxic and inflammatory foods: 2) Rebuilding the Body & Rebuild the Gut: 3) Identifying environmental toxins: 4) Healing autoimmune-related infections: 5) Emotional release process and lifestyle changes Follow this program, Whether you're battling diabetes, cancer, multiple sclerosis, thyroid disease, autoimmune disease, IBS or obesity, or you simply want to put an end to nagging minor symptoms and get back to full health. Our Holistic approach, based on the latest scientific research is designed for optimum weight loss without starvation and to fight and defeat the full spectrum of autoimmune diseases, rebuild your gut flora, and reclaim your full health and well being for good. Each Program Includes Easy to Follow comprehensive 5 Step Plan, Lifestyle guidelines, Diet Guidelines, Resources, Education ,Scientific Research and the incredible must have Gut Rebuilding Program full of world unique recipes and guides from expert fermentationist, functional health therapist and psychotherapist Darren Maguire.   Included in the 8 week Life Change [...]

By | 2018-08-21T19:08:40+01:00 May 6th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Reclaim your Health on our new 6 week Life Change Program with Plant Based Academy

Join The Plant Based Revolution. Go Vegan 2019 with Plant Based Academy

You love animals, right? Well, did you know that the best way to save animals is by going vegan? By cutting meat and dairy products from your diet, you'll be saving the lives of more than 100 animals a year. Animals value their lives as much as you value yours. So do your best not to eat them. Make the switch to a compassionate, healthy lifestyle today by signing up for our Raw Food Mastery course at Plant Based Academy. After 30 days of living meat- and dairy-free, you'll feel so great that you just might turn 30 days into a lifetime. Watch the videos below and sign up for one of our upcoming course if you would like to eat better, feel better, and stop supporting cruelty to chickens, pigs, cows, and other animals raised for food.       "Raw vegan food is not boring salads and uncooked vegetables, raw food is a culinary pursuit, a dedication and endeavor to transforming the highest quality of vegetables using simple techniques to extract exquisite flavors, preserving the essential nutrients and enzymes and complementing them with an array of mineral rich nuts, seeds, seaweeds, sprouts and fruits. Raw vegan food is the pursuit of perfect food, art for the eyes, a taste of naturalness, unparalleled nourishment for the body and great for the planet too" - Plant Based Academy       Making a commitment to healthy eating is a great start towards a healthier life for you, for animals and our planet. Watch the educational movie below which outlines the practises used in meat and dairy production. We believe that animals are not ours to eat, wear, experiment on, use for our entertainment or abuse in any other way. Yet many people have never considered the impact that their clothes, food, cosmetics or entertainment [...]

By | 2019-01-10T01:36:25+00:00 May 3rd, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Join The Plant Based Revolution. Go Vegan 2019 with Plant Based Academy

How Repressed Emotions can Impact our Health

In effect, when we repress emotions—just as when we are completely at their mercy, such as in moments of untrammeled rage—we are playing havoc with our nervous system, hormonal apparatus, immune system, intestines, heart, and other organs. The result can be chronic or acute illness. As repressed anger eventually turns against us, the immune system can as well, as in autoimmune disorders, for example. “The art of not experiencing feelings. A child can experience her feelings only when there is somebody there who accepts her fully, understands her, and supports her. If that person is missing, if the child must risk losing the mother's love of her substitute in order to feel, then she will repress emotions.” By Alice Miller Relational Trauma Recovery At Trauma Recovery Institute we address three of the core Attachment Styles, their origin’s the way they reveal themselves in relationships, and methods for transforming attachment hurt into healing. We use the latest discoveries in Neuroscience which enhances our capacity for deepening intimacy. The foundation for establishing healthy relationships relies on developing secure attachment skills, thus increasing your sensitivity for contingency and relational attunement. According to Allan Schore, the regulatory function of the brain is experience-dependent and he says that, as an infant, our Mother is our whole environment. In our relational trauma recovery approach you will learn to understand how the early patterns of implicit memory – which is pre-verbal, sub-psychological, and non-conceptual – build pathways in our brain that affect our attachment styles. Clinically, we can shift such ingrained associative patterns in our established neural network by bringing in new and different “lived” experiences in the Here and Now.   Working with repressed emotions at Trauma Recovery Institute Trauma Recovery Institute offers unparalleled services and treatment approach through unique individual and group psychotherapy. We specialise [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:28+00:00 May 2nd, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on How Repressed Emotions can Impact our Health

Stress the biggest Killer, how stress impacts our neurobiology and leads to disease

Stress Researchers have demonstrated that the brain responds to psychological stress in the same way that it reacts to physical threats: by activating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and “fight or flight” responses via the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). Robert Sapolsky is one of the world's leading neuroscientists.In studying wild baboon populations, Sapolsky examined how prolonged stress can cause physical and mental afflictions. His lab was among the first to document that stress can damage the neurons of the hippocampus. Sapolsky has shown, in both human and baboon societies, that low social status is a major contributor to stress and stress-related illness. He boils down the contemporary human's relationship with stress as follows: "We are not getting our ulcers being chased by Saber-tooth tigers, we're inventing our social stressors—and if some baboons are good at dealing with this, we should be able to as well. Insofar as we're smart enough to have invented this stuff and stupid enough to fall for it, we have the potential to be wise enough to keep these stressors in perspective." Sapolsky's study of stress in non-human primates has offered fascinating insight into how human beings relate to this universal pressure. A stressor is anything in the outside world that knocks you out of homeostatic balance. So to reestablish that balance, you secrete adrenaline and other hormones. You mobilize energy and you deliver it where it’s needed, you shut off the inessentials like the sex drive and digestion, you enhance immune defenses, and you think more clearly. You’re facing a short-term physical crisis, and the stress response is what you do with your body. For 99 percent of the species on this planet, stress is three minutes of screaming terror in the savannah, after which either it’s over with or you’re over with. That’s all you [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:29+00:00 May 2nd, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Stress the biggest Killer, how stress impacts our neurobiology and leads to disease

Dance, when you’re broken open. Dance, if you’ve torn the bandage off. Dance in the middle of the fighting. Dance in your blood. Dance when you’re perfectly free – Rumi

Dance involves the culturally mediated body, emotion, and mind. So do illness and pain. Dance may promote wellness by strengthening the immune system through muscular action and physiological processes. Dance conditions an individual to moderate, eliminate, or avoid tension, chronic fatigue, and other disabling conditions that result from the effects of stress. Dance may help the healing process as a person gains a sense of control through (1) possession by the spiritual in dance, (2) mastery of movement, (3) escape or diversion from stress and pain through a change in emotion, states of consciousness, and/or physical capability, and (4) confronting stressors to work through ways of handling their effects.   The Dancer, Once upon a time, a dancer and her musicians came to the court of the Prince of Birkasha. She was admitted in the court, and she danced to the music of the flute, the lute, and the zither. She danced the dance of flames and fire and the dance of swords and spears; she danced the dance of stars and the dance of space, and then she danced the dance of flowers in the wind. When she had finished, she approached the prince and bowed her body before him. The prince asked her to come nearer, and said unto her: "Beautiful woman, daughter of grace and delight, whence comes your art? And how is it that you command all the elements in your rhythms and your rhymes?" The dancer came near, bowed her body again and said: "Gracious majesty, I know not the answer to your questionings. Only this I know: the philosopher soul dwells within her head, the poet soul dwells within her heart, the singer soul dwells within her throat, but the soul of the dancer dwells in all her body. By Khalil Gibran The Spiritual [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:30+00:00 May 2nd, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Dance, when you’re broken open. Dance, if you’ve torn the bandage off. Dance in the middle of the fighting. Dance in your blood. Dance when you’re perfectly free – Rumi

Brief summary of personality disorders, borderline personality disorder and narcissistic personality disorder

Personality disorder, as a term, may sound negative and judgmental and it is important to have a clear understanding with our patients of the meaning of the term. We explain that there is a group of disorders in the DSM-V, six of them to be specific, that are thought to be long-term and enduring, in contrast to episodic, personality styles that at their core are defined by difficulties in the person’s subjective, internal sense of identity, and chronic difficulties in his or her interpersonal relationships. It is noteworthy that the DSM-V description of personality disorders includes this emphasis on sense of self and relations with others more than the previous editions of the DSM did.   These different styles have many overlapping features and most people have a mixture of those styles, but most importantly, that when people personify and live out any of those styles with a certain consistency, inflexibility, and in such a way that causes a certain level of distress in one’s emotional and interpersonal life, they meet criteria for a personality disorder. For patients with BPD, in reviewing the DSM-V symptoms that the particular patient in question meets, we note that there are different sub-types of BPD patients, each with different sets of primary or most-problematic features. Some may be more impulsive and overtly inappropriately angry, whereas others may be more “under the radar,” characterized more prominently by the sense of emptiness, fears of abandonment, suicidal feelings, and more subtle shifts in their experience of others, from idealizing others to more quietly feeling devaluing or contemptuous of them. So with each patient we explain our understanding of his or her BPD symptoms. We also find it helpful to give an overview of BPD as a disorder comprising difficulties in four areas: 1) emotions tend to be intense and [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:31+00:00 April 29th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Brief summary of personality disorders, borderline personality disorder and narcissistic personality disorder

Brief summary of Narcissistic Personality Disorder as opposed to character pathlogy with narcissistic defenses

Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) Otto Kernberg’s description of the pathological narcissistic individual centers around a set of paradoxes: self-inflation existing alongside a limitless need for praise, a charming and engaging surface covering a ruthless interior, and a persona of self-sufficiency defending against underlying feelings of intense envy . For Kernberg, the diagnosis of the narcissistic character also depends on the quality of the person’s object relations and the pattern of his or her intrapsychic defenses. Narcissistic individuals experience their relationships with others as exploitative and parasitic. They divide the world between those who contain something that they can extract and those who do not. They distinguish between extraordinary people on the one hand - in association with whom narcissistic individuals experience a sense of greatness themselves - and mediocre or worthless people on the other. Narcissistic individuals idealize the former and are contemptuous of the latter. Yet those they idealize they also fear, as they project onto them their own exploitative wishes and experience them as potentially attacking and coercive. They thus are unable to rely on any object and fear dependence on another person, rendering all their object relations empty and dissatisfying. Like the borderline character, Kernberg’s narcissistic individual uses primitive defenses of devaluation, projective identification, omnipotence, and primitive idealization in his or her efforts to preserve self-esteem and self-coherence and to combat the intense feelings of envy and rage that threaten to undermine them. The narcissistic individual is distinguished from the borderline individual by his or her sense of object constancy, better impulse control, and better social and professional functioning, although these too may be fragile and hollow beneath a surface of apparent solidity. Although splitting as a defense is found in narcissistic pathology, its use is less prominent than in borderline pathology. The grandiose self further differentiates [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:32+00:00 April 29th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Brief summary of Narcissistic Personality Disorder as opposed to character pathlogy with narcissistic defenses

Addiction & Trauma Recovery at Trauma Recovery Institute Dublin – Addiction is a Response to Childhood Suffering by Gabor Mate

Trauma Recovery Institute specializes in the treatment of trauma such as complex trauma, sexual trauma and relational trauma including personality disorders. Trauma Recovery Institute is the psychotherapy department of Life Change Health Institute which is a world unique holistic treament centre known for its focus on the connection between mind and body health working with people through Nutrition, Lifestyle, sexuality, parenting and psychotherapy. Trauma Recovery Institute promotes and offers long term relational bod focused psychotherapy as opposed to other ineffective treatment strategies offering quick-fix solutions to complex issues. Trauma Recovery Institute runs a wide range of specialised groups in Dublin 2. Trauma Recovery Institute uses a very unique highly structured psychotherapeutic approach called Dynamic Psychosocialsomatic Psychotherapy (DPP) which addresses effectively not only the symptomology of complex trauma and addiction but also the root causes of these very common and destruictive life challenges. “The greatest damage done by neglect, trauma or emotional loss is not the immediate pain they inflict but the long-term distortions they induce in the way a developing child will continue to interpret the world and her situation in it. All too often these ill-conditioned implicit beliefs become self-fulfilling prophecies in our lives. We create meanings from our unconscious interpretation of early events, and then we forge our present experiences from the meaning we’ve created. Unwittingly, we write the story of our future from narratives based on the past.” ― Gabor Maté                                                     Addiction is a Response to Childhood Suffering By gabor mate I completely appreciate the 12 steps, and I talk about them in my book where I have an appendix on them. I think where they fail or where they miss something is when [...]

By | 2019-02-24T21:20:26+00:00 April 25th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Addiction & Trauma Recovery at Trauma Recovery Institute Dublin – Addiction is a Response to Childhood Suffering by Gabor Mate

Core energetic focussed work at Trauma Recovery Institute

Core Energetics is a powerful personal development approach: Which seeks the integration of all aspects of your being; mind, body, emotions, spirit, and your will. It is a supportive process that enables you to explore your past and present issues and patterns. Your Practitioner partners with you to bring about a greater awareness of yourself and a deeper experience of your feelings. You begin to let go of defensive patterns that no longer serve you. Through this unified and holistic process, you take steps on a journey to connect ever more deeply with your Core essence. Your truest nature is energetic, creative, loving, and open to life. Core Energetics is a dynamic system for personal growth, healing, and transformation. You work to unblock your innate life force through the use of movement, breath, voice, and other techniques. You gain greater understanding of what makes you tick. This understanding opens up more choices about what you create in your life. When your energy is blocked, your body and personality suffer. When your energy is flowing, long standing patterns shift. You have more clarity, purpose, and pleasure. Though we begin with the body, the five levels overlap at various stages of the process. Core Energetics presupposes that feelings flow on energy, carried through the body on the breath. That energy, which is meant to flow in the healthy person, is sometimes blocked, split, or leaky in an unconscious effort to prevent the flow/experience of feelings. This process of blocking energy and the flow of feelings starts very early in life, when the child perceives needs not being met. It may be created to stop the flow of painful or “parentally unacceptable” feelings, but in turn, it blocks the flow of the creative life force within the individual. The child finds many ways [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:33+00:00 April 21st, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Core energetic focussed work at Trauma Recovery Institute

Radical Aliveness Workshop – A unique blend of shamanic Breathwork, Core energetics, Group Psychotherapy and Tantra

This Radical Aliveness workshop is a unique blend of shamanic breathwork, Core energetics, Tantra and Group Psychotherapy. This will be a day of deep transformative exploration and healing within a very safe and supportive space held by very experienced therapists. There will be a maximum of 12 participants (Male and Female). Prebooking is essential. No prior breathwork experience required. What is Shamanic Breathwork? It is a powerful tool of transformation using the BREATH to induce a trance-like state. Because we are not used to breathing so deeply and consistently for such a long period of time, the oxygen floods the body and the brain allowing the ego mind to step aside. Under the influence of breath, the psyche is able to bring up anything from the subconscious that is ready to present itself to you and be worked through. Typically there may be something that is needing to be released, realized, redefined, etc. In this way, it is possible to shift patterns of thought and behavior that lie deep in the unconscious.

By | 2016-04-21T15:23:31+01:00 April 21st, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Radical Aliveness Workshop – A unique blend of shamanic Breathwork, Core energetics, Group Psychotherapy and Tantra

The Art of Intimacy workshop – Deepen your Relationships, Love and Intimacy – Book Now

Embodied Tantra Ireland, empowering you to thrive in love, sexuality and intimacy. Embodied Tantra is living with an awareness in the moment through the body in an intimate connection with self, others and all that is. This allows you to have more choice, and to access more of what you are capable of, including pleasure, love, Intimacy and healthy attachments. Embodied Tantra groups and workshops are very powerful , safe, empowering, informative, psychoeducational, psychotherapeutic and liberating. Embodied Tantra is suitable for people at all levels including complete beginners of Tantra practise. Embodied Tantra is a dive deeper, a tantra workshop with difference, where not only will you learn tools for living intimately but get an opportunity to work through any blocks you have to intimacy and is perfect for anybody looking to create a healthy relationship with strong boundaries, communication, intimacy, connection, love, happiness and passionate love making. "Tantra is not technique but prayer. Is not head oriented but a relaxation into the heart. Please remember it. Many books have been written onTantra, they all talk about technique but the real Tantra has nothing to do with technique. The real Tantra cannot be written about, the real Tantra has to be imbibed(absorbed). How to imbibe real Tantra? You will have to transform your whole approach." Osho The Art of Intimacy One Day Tantra Workshop Deepen your relationships, communication and intimacy during a transformational introduction workshop of psychoeducation, intimacy & Boundaries exercises and gentle exploration of attachmnet style and patterns. Both workshops are suitable for both singles and couples. In This workshop you will get the following: 1)Develop an understanding of the Tantric framework. 2)Discover Tantric principles for creating extraordinary relationships. 3)Learn how to break old relationship patterns and shift the cycles that do not serve you. 4)Discover how Tantric principles [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:33+00:00 April 15th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on The Art of Intimacy workshop – Deepen your Relationships, Love and Intimacy – Book Now

Plant Based Academy – Raw & Vegan Culinary School – Now Enrolling for courses starting in 2016/2017

Plant Based Academy is a raw and vegan culinary school. Training, educating and empowering students on plant based culinary art, vegan nutritional science and conscious living. Plant Based Academy is the only classically structured raw food course in Europe and world unique in its content, Certification and delivery. Plant Based Academy offers a number of comprehensive and single module raw food programs both on site at our raw kitchen and online. Plant Based Academy offers the most advanced Raw Food Training available anywhere in the world. Our Raw Food Programs are suitable for beginners and advanced raw foodists. Curriculum includes advanced classes in cacao making, raw cosmetics, herbal tonics and tinctures, medicinal mushrooms, raw lifestyle, travelling on raw, advanced fermentation and much more. On all of our Raw Food Mastery Programs students learn about real organic raw foods & raw food nutrition and how to prepare delicious, healthy raw organic meals just like a professonal chef. The course is delivered by a professional chef with over 20 years of professional chef experience. Students learn how to think and work like a chef using skills and techniques that will transform how you think about raw foods, giving you the skills to not only be healthly but to thrive with delicious raw foods, fermented foods, herbal preapartions and how to prepare and use raw organic skin care products to enhance your health and well being. Students Learn how to create delicious refined clean raw food without the use of cashew nuts and agave. All Modules are delivered within a framework of nutritional science, students will learn how to extract maximum nutrients from raw food and learn techniques to help the absorption of nutrients as very often many long term vegans, and raw foodists are deficient in many nutrients such as iodine, zinc, [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:33+00:00 April 15th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Plant Based Academy – Raw & Vegan Culinary School – Now Enrolling for courses starting in 2016/2017

Vegan House in Dublin from January 01st 2019

Rooms or Entire Home to let for vegans. Property is very tidy and is located in a very nice and quiet area in Dublin 22. The property is just 30 minutes on a bus from city centre, the no 13 bus stop is just two minutes walk from the property and the no 151 bus stop is just 4 minute walk from property. The Property is a very quiet estate in Dublin 22. There are three bedrooms, 1 large room, another large room with ensuite and 1 small Bedroom. There is hot water 24 hours per day. There is WiFi and Tv if needed. There is a washing machine and dryer availabe to use. There is no smoking in house or gardens. There is an organic garden and organic sprout house out back. the entire house water is filtered and chlorine free and the drinking water is connected to an extra reverse osmosis water filter. House is mostly unfurnished. Rooms or complete home are available from End of December on a sublet basis for one year. Rent is based on a fair market rate. There is a deposit required which will be equal to one months rent. Rent must be paid one month in advance. If you are interseted renting a room or entire home, please fill out the form below. Thank you and I look forward to meeting you . Feel free to ask any Questions.   Sprout House out Back Garden

By | 2018-11-15T12:32:32+00:00 April 9th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Vegan House in Dublin from January 01st 2019

Personality Disorders – The Three Levels of Personality Organization

In this article we will explore Object Relations Theory of Personality Disorders introduced by theorist and researcher Otto Kernberg, Dr. Kernberg is an object relations theorist, a psychoanalyst and professor of psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College. He is most widely known for his psychoanalytic theories on borderline personality organization and narcissistic pathology. He is founder of transference focused psychotherapy He is one of the more influential voices today on the subject of severe personality disorders. In order to understand his work, it is helpful to understand the object relations theory upon which it is based. According to object relations theory, beginning during infancy, people develop "internal representations" of themselves and of other people. Representations of the self ultimately give rise to what is popularly known as the "self-concept." Similar representations form as a means of organizing knowledge of other people. Though these representations are of people, the psychodynamic tradition is to refer to them as "objects" thereby highlighting the distinction between two people; the person of the self who is the observer, and the person being observed, the object. Thus, a person's internal representations of self-and-other (self-and-object) and their representation of how self-and-other get along are collectively known as internal object relations. These object relations are seen as the building blocks organizing people's internal life, including their motivations and behavior. The information stored within internal object relations includes the emotional tone of those relations; i.e., the emotional tone of what it is like for the self-and-other to interact with each other. Though many emotions may occur within the context of a given relationship, there is generally a dominant tone, or "affect" which reflects the way each relationship usually feels. As infants interact with their caregivers, they begin to form internal object relations to represent these interactions. This experience is stored along [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:36+00:00 March 16th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Personality Disorders – The Three Levels of Personality Organization

The Power of Group Psychotherapy in our lives and how it can help make our society a better place to live in and a better place for our children to Play in.

Group Psychotherapy, why it is good for all of us. As humans we are social animals who remains group-oriented to ensure survival, connection and belonging. Our lives begin in family groups and we function thereafter as members of groups at school, work and in communities. The origin of the power of the group as an agent of change to promote healing lies buried in antiquity. But, as noted by Rutan and Alonso (1979), group psychotherapy, where one’s family and community are represented in the room, provides unique opportunities to work on issues of intimacy and individuation. It is well known that anyone with a history of destructive relationships will continue, long into adult life, continue to attract destructive relationships into their lives as a debilitating and painful life pattern. Group Psychotherapy becomes a very powerful platform to change this pattern as it is explored within a framework of healthy relating within the group. Even for those without a history of overt trauma can carry behaviors from primary relationships as a child and continue these behaviors into adult life even when these behaviors do not serve as healthy prerequisites for healthy, happy and intimate relationships. In a sense these unconscious behaviors get in the way of Life, very often it can be difficult to make sense of why life is not working as we would like or relationships are not as successful as we would like and without a platform such as Group Psychotherapy, it is very difficult to explore these behaviors and work through these early relational patterns that are getting in the way of health and happiness.   "Everyone sees the unseen in proportion to the clarity of his heart, and that depends upon how much he has polished it. Whoever has polished it more sees more — more unseen forms become [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:42+00:00 March 15th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on The Power of Group Psychotherapy in our lives and how it can help make our society a better place to live in and a better place for our children to Play in.

Embodied Tantra Ireland workshops and groups 2016

Embodied Tantra Ireland, empowering you to thrive in love, sexuality and intimacy. Embodied Tantra is living with an awareness in the moment through the body in an intimate connection with self, others and all that is. This allows you to have more choice, and to access more of what you are capable of, including pleasure, love, Intimacy and healthy attachments. Embodied Tantra groups and workshops are very powerful , safe, empowering, informative, psychoeducational, psychotherapeutic and liberating. Embodied Tantra is suitable for people at all levels including complete beginners of Tantra practise. Embodied Tantra is a dive deeper, a tantra workshop with difference, where not only will you learn tools for living intimately but get an opportunity to work through any blocks you have to intimacy and is perfect for anybody looking to create a healthy relationship with strong boundaries, communication, intimacy, connection, love, happiness and passionate love making.   "Tantra is not technique but prayer. Is not head oriented but a relaxation into the heart. Please remember it. Many books have been written onTantra, they all talk about technique but the real Tantra has nothing to do with technique. The real Tantra cannot be written about, the real Tantra has to be imbibed(absorbed). How to imbibe real Tantra? You will have to transform your whole approach." Osho   Embodied Tantra Events  Deepen your relationships, communication and intimacy during a transformational introduction workshop of psychoeducation, intimacy & Boundaries exercises and gentle exploration of attachmnet style and patterns. Both workshops are suitable for both singles and couples. In bothj our workshops you will get the following: 1)Develop an understanding of the Tantric framework. 2)Discover Tantric principles for creating extraordinary relationships. 3)Learn how to break old relationship patterns and shift the cycles that do not serve you. 4)Discover how Tantric principles can help you attract your perfect [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:42+00:00 March 12th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Embodied Tantra Ireland workshops and groups 2016

Dynamic Psychosocialsomatic Psychotherapy and working with Transference, Countertransference and Reenactments in Psychotherapy

Recurrent themes affecting the transference and countertransference with people who have suffered huge trauma in early childhood, start with the patient’s wariness of the therapist and the dangers involved in intimacy. In addition, dependency, reliance and counter dependent and counter phobic defenses tend to emerge, often-cloaked in overt idealization of the therapist. In this idealization, patients may expect the therapist to be all attentive, nurturing, non-seductive and nonabusing parent who will heal and undo the trauma. All these themes tend to appear in concerns about boundaries, secrecy, control and power and in discussion of fees, confidentiality, and other issues related to the frame of the treatment.   "Transference is the source of conflict but also expression of conflict"   Behavioral reenactments in treatment allow a patient to communicate previously dissociated and therefore unsymbolised, material to the therapist. By exploring verbally what has been communicated through behavior the therapist and patient initiate a process by which the dissociated material becomes encoded in language, and therefore available for conscious consideration. Behaviors associated with a reenactment in therapy are unconscious messages from the patient to the therapist and to himself about a traumatic past. They represent an attempt to bypass the need for symbolized experience. Reenactments are most likely to occur when the patient has a reduced capacity for self-reflection, another result of being unable to verbalize traumatic experiences that were never encoded when they first occurred, as a result of not have a present witness to their pain. Memories became trapped encased within a wordless world. Incapable of articulating what he has never symbolized verbally, the patent repeats behaviorally or reenacts an aspect of his dissociated trauma.   "Transference is also an assimilation of what might happen in the future if we act on the impulse in the here and now, also as [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:43+00:00 March 11th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Dynamic Psychosocialsomatic Psychotherapy and working with Transference, Countertransference and Reenactments in Psychotherapy

OnSite and Online Courses available at Plant Based Accademy including our 12 week Certification Raw Food Mastery Level III Professional Course

Plant Based Academy is a raw and vegan culinary school. Training, educating and empowering students on plant based culinary art, vegan nutritional science and conscious living. Plant Based Academy is the only classically structured raw food course in Europe and world unique in its content, Certification and delivery. Plant Based Academy offers a number of comprehensive and single module raw food programs both on site at our raw kitchen and online.  Plant Based Academy offers the most advanced Raw Food Training available anywhere in the world. Our Raw Food Programs are suitable for beginners and advanced raw foodists. Curriculum includes advanced classes in cacao making, raw cosmetics, herbal tonics and tinctures, medicinal mushrooms, raw lifestyle, travelling on raw, advanced fermentation and much more. On all of our Raw Food Mastery Programs students learn about real organic raw foods & raw food nutrition and how to prepare delicious, healthy raw organic meals just like a professonal chef. The course is delivered by a professional chef with over 20 years of professional chef experience. Students learn how to think and work like a chef using skills and techniques that will transform how you think about raw foods, giving you the skills to not only be healthly but to thrive with delicious raw foods, fermented foods, herbal preapartions and how to prepare and use raw organic skin care products to enhance your health and well being. Students Learn how to create delicious refined clean raw food without the use of cashew nuts and agave. All Modules are delivered within a framework of nutritional science, students will learn how to extract maximum nutrients from raw food and learn techniques to help the absorption of nutrients as very often many long term vegans, and raw foodists are deficient in many nutrients such as iodine, zinc, [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:43+00:00 March 9th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on OnSite and Online Courses available at Plant Based Accademy including our 12 week Certification Raw Food Mastery Level III Professional Course

Cancer Treatment at Life Change Health Institute through Diet and Lifestyle Changes

Cancer incidence. One in three people in Ireland will develop cancer during their lifetime. In Ireland an average of 30,000 new cases of cancer are diagnosed each year. The number is expected to rise to over 40,000 per year by 2020. The five most common cancers in Ireland are Non melanoma skin cancer (the most common and treatable form of skin cancer), prostate cancer, breast cancer, bowel cancer and lung cancer. Up to 50% of all cancers are preventable, 30% are preventable through lifestyle changes alone. These Statistics are taken from cancer.ie Cancer is formed from a stem cell where the Dna of the stem cell has been damaged through epigenitics, Diet, Lifestyle, stress or a combination of all. This damaged stem cell becomes immortal and starts to produce cells at a rapid rate, when the immune system is already compromised due to diet, lifestyle, infections, stress etc it does not detect the rapid growth of theses daughter cells produced by the stem cell, over time these cells produced at a rapid rate form a tumor . Conventional treatments aim to shrink the tumor , sometimes with success but these treatments never address the root problem of the stem cell and also attack surrounding healthy cells, further compromise the immune system and lymphatic system whilst feeding the body with a poisonous carcinogenic such as chemotherapy. Cancel cells are hypoxic and thrive in an anaerobic (without oxygen) unlike healthy cells which need oxygen supply, this means that cancer cells change their metabolism through a process called engiogenis and form their own blood vessels to supply the tumor with nutrients to survive. Cancer cells also thrive in acidic environment and feeds on sugar. For one who has developed a tumor means that the body has alreday been sick and the cancer is a result not [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:45+00:00 February 8th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Cancer Treatment at Life Change Health Institute through Diet and Lifestyle Changes

Trauma Recovery Institute Dublin 2

Trauma Recovery Institute offers unparalleled services and treatment approach through unique individual and group psychotherapy. We specialise in long-term relational trauma recovery, sexual trauma recovery and early childhood trauma recovery. We also offer specialized group psychotherapy for psychotherapists and psychotherapy students, People struggling with addictions and substance abuse, sexual abuse survivors and people looking to function in life at a higher level. Trauma recovery Institute offers a very safe supportive space for deep relational work with highly skilled and experienced psychotherapists accredited with Irish Group Psychotherapy Society (IGPS), which holds the highest accreditation standard in Europe. Trauma Recovery Institute uses a highly structured psychotherapeutic approach called Dynamic Psychosocialsomatic Psychotherapy (DPP). At Trauma Recovery Institute we address three of the core Attachment Styles, their origin’s the way they reveal themselves in relationships, and methods for transforming attachment hurt into healing. We use the latest discoveries in Neuroscience which enhances our capacity for deepening intimacy. The foundation for establishing healthy relationships relies on developing secure attachment skills, thus increasing your sensitivity for contingency and relational attunement. According to Allan Schore, the regulatory function of the brain is experience-dependent and he says that, as an infant, our Mother is our whole environment. In our relational trauma recovery approach you will learn to understand how the early patterns of implicit memory – which is pre-verbal, sub-psychological, and non-conceptual – build pathways in our brain that affect our attachment styles. Clinically, we can shift such ingrained associative patterns in our established neural network by bringing in new and different “lived” experiences in the Here and Now. The Role of the Therapist in transforming attachment trauma: Healing into wholeness takes the active participation of at least one other brain, mind, and body to repair past injuries – and that can be accomplished through a one-to-one therapeutic relationship, [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:47+00:00 February 8th, 2016|Testimonials|Comments Off on Trauma Recovery Institute Dublin 2

About Borderline Personality Disorder

Personality disorder, as a term, may sound negative and judgmental and it is important to have a clear understanding with our patients of the meaning of the term. We explain that there is a group of disorders in the DSM-V, six of them to be specific, that are thought to be long-term and enduring, in contrast to episodic, personality styles that at their core are defined by difficulties in the person’s subjective, internal sense of identity, and chronic difficulties in his or her interpersonal relationships. It is noteworthy that the DSM-V description of personality disorders includes this emphasis on sense of self and relations with others more than the previous editions of the DSM did. We explain that the six different styles have many overlapping features and that most people have a mixture of those styles, but most importantly, that when people personify and live out any of those styles with a certain consistency, inflexibility, and in such a way that causes a certain level of distress in one’s emotional and interpersonal life, they meet criteria for a personality disorder. For patients with BPD, in reviewing the DSM-IV symptoms that the particular patient in question meets, we note that there are different sub-types of BPD patients, each with different sets of primary or most-problematic features. Some may be more impulsive and overtly inappropriately angry, whereas others may be more “under the radar,” characterized more prominently by the sense of emptiness, fears of abandonment, suicidal feelings, and more subtle shifts in their experience of others, from idealizing others to more quietly feeling devaluing or contemptuous of them. So with each patient we explain our understanding of his or her BPD symptoms. We also find it helpful to give an overview of BPD as a disorder comprising difficulties in four areas: 1) [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:47+00:00 February 5th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on About Borderline Personality Disorder

About Transference-Focused Psychotherapy (TFP)

Our approach to personality disorder treatment and research is based on the understanding of personality disorders in general and BPD in specific that is described on this page. Transference-Focused Psychotherapy is grounded in contemporary psychoanalytic theory since we believe that psychoanalytic thinking has much to offer in terms of understanding and treating personality disorders. However, our approach includes specific modifications of technique to address the therapeutic needs of patients with borderline and other personality disorders. Our patients do not lie on the couch, do not come to see us four or five times per week, and we, the therapists, are far from silent and removed from the process. Two beliefs that inform our work, that we share with most other psychoanalysts, and that distinguish our work from that of say, a cognitive-behavioral therapy (for example, Dialectical Behavior Therapy [DBT], another treatment for BPD) are that: (1) “Symptoms,” the observable, behavioral manifestations of any disorder, are explained significantly by internal, mental or emotional factors, not generally visible to the naked eye, and that attention to these internal emotional factors or states is an essential part of the treatment process; and (2) Over the course of a psychotherapy, some of the emotional factors that influence the problematic behaviors or symptoms and that had previously been unclear to the patient and therapist become clear to both through their mutual, careful attention to the goings on in the treatment relationship, which includes the transference of images within the patient’s mind, which they may not be fully aware of, to the person of the therapist (and others in their life). So with this overview, let us now proceed to build on our understanding of personality disorders to explain how we conceptualize treatment. Within the International Society for Transference-Focused Psychotherapy, one of the more challenging aspects [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:48+00:00 February 5th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on About Transference-Focused Psychotherapy (TFP)

Treating Maladaptive Presentations from Adverse Childhood Experience

The Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study is one of the largest investigations ever conducted to assess associations between childhood maltreatment and later-life health and well-being. The study is a collaboration between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Kaiser Permanente's Health Appraisal Clinic in San Diego. More than 17,000 Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) members undergoing a comprehensive physical examination chose to provide detailed information about their childhood experience of abuse, neglect, and family dysfunction. To date, more than 50 scientific articles have been published and more than100 conference and workshop presentations have been made. The ACE Study findings suggest that certain experiences are major risk factors for the leading causes of illness and death as well as poor quality of life in the United States. Neglect, physical abuse, custodial interference and sexual abuse are types of child maltreatment that can lead to poor physical and mental health well into adulthood. It is critical to understand how some of the worst health and social problems in our nation can arise as a consequence of adverse childhood experiences. Realizing these connections is likely to improve efforts towards prevention and recovery. If you are suffering with an illness or addiction, finding relationships challenging, attracting the wrong people into your life, continously falling in love with an emotionally unavailable partners, struggling with porn, sex & love addictions, or struggling to find joy in life. There is a very high possibility that you have suffered adverse childhood experiences regardless of how covert they may seem and when left unresolved can manifest in a host of life challenges with Money, Sex, relationships, mental Health, emotional health and physical health. Find your ACE score below. Treatment of Relational and complex Trauma at Trauma Recovery Institute Trauma Recovery Institute offers unparalleled services and treatment approach through unique [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:48+00:00 January 25th, 2016|Testimonials|Comments Off on Treating Maladaptive Presentations from Adverse Childhood Experience

What is Attachment Theory, what is My Attachment Style and What does it mean in my Relationships ?

Attachment is a special emotional relationship that involves an exchange of comfort, care, and pleasure. The roots of research on attachment began with Freud's theories about love, but another researcher is usually credited as the father of attachment theory. Bowlby shared the psychoanalytic view that early experiences in childhood have an important influence on development and behavior later in life. Our early attachment styles are established in childhood through the infant/caregiver relationship. In addition to this, Bowlby believed that attachment had an evolutionary component; it aids in survival. "The propensity to make strong emotional bonds to particular individuals [is] a basic component of human nature" (Bowlby, 1988, 3). Attachment refers the particular way in which you relate to other people. Your style of attachment was formed at the very beginning of your life, during your first two years.  Once established, it is a style that stays with you and plays out today in how you relate in intimate relationships and in how you parent your children. Understanding your style of attachment is helpful because it offers you insight into how you felt and developed in your childhood. It also clarifies ways that you are emotionally limited as an adult and what you need to change to improve your close relationships and your relationship with your own children. John Bowlby’s investigation into the intense distress caused in children when separated from their parents led him to define what he called the attachment behavioral system. Later work by Mary Ainsworth made clear distinctions of attachment categories (known as attachment styles) including Secure, avoidant, ambivalent, and disorganised. Contemporary research shows that these early experiences in childhood repeat themselves in adult relationships by how we interact in and what we expect from our significant other. Further work on attachment theory has been done by experts Allan Schore, Dan Siegel, [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:49+00:00 January 24th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on What is Attachment Theory, what is My Attachment Style and What does it mean in my Relationships ?

Group Psychotherapy for people with and without a history of trauma , What is Group Psychotherapy and how can it help me ?

Group Psychotherapy is a life changing opportunity to work through difficult traumatic events past and present that have been holding you back in Life, Love and Relationships. Adverse childhood experience happens within your primary relationship as a result of poor attachment or lack of attachment. Group Psychotherapy becomes an intimate relationship where you get an opportunity to work through relationship trauma and become a participant in healthy relationship where conflict can be resolved in a health way. This is one of the goals of group psychotherapy. Participating in group psychotherapy will help you with all your relationships in life particular the relationship with self. Group Psychotherapy can be a great springboard to function better in life, love, and relationships and work. We invest in our financial well being with saving schemes, investments, and pensions. We invest in our psychical well being with boot camps and diets and yet in Ireland we do not have a culture of investing in our emotional well being, as a culture we don't invest anything into our emotional health. Investing in our emotional health can yield great rewards far greater than other investments, this investment into our emotional life and health has the most potential to serve us in both short term and long-term. Trauma Recovery Institute offers a range of groups and specifically a number of groups which are not geared towards depression or trauma but groups for people who function very well in society but are looking to function in the world at a higher level, through participating in group Psychotherapy it's a platform to work through patterns of behaviour, beliefs and relating style ultimately giving you opportunity to function at the highest possible level in all areas of your life because you are investing in your emotional health.   Three Benifits of [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:50+00:00 January 24th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Group Psychotherapy for people with and without a history of trauma , What is Group Psychotherapy and how can it help me ?

Microbes Help produce Serotonin in Gut

Although serotonin is well known as a brain neurotransmitter, it is estimated that 90 percent of the body's serotonin is made in the digestive tract. In fact, altered levels of this peripheral serotonin have been linked to diseases such as irritable bowel syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and osteoporosis. New research at Caltech, published in the April 9 issue of the journal Cell, shows that certain bacteria in the gut are important for the production of peripheral serotonin. "More and more studies are showing that mice or other model organisms with changes in their gut microbes exhibit altered behaviors," explains Elaine Hsiao, research assistant professor of biology and biological engineering and senior author of the study. "We are interested in how microbes communicate with the nervous system. To start, we explored the idea that normal gut microbes could influence levels of neurotransmitters in their hosts." Peripheral serotonin is produced in the digestive tract by enterochromaffin (EC) cells and also by particular types of immune cells and neurons. Hsiao and her colleagues first wanted to know if gut microbes have any effect on serotonin production in the gut and, if so, in which types of cells. They began by measuring peripheral serotonin levels in mice with normal populations of gut bacteria and also in germ-free mice that lack these resident microbes. The researchers found that the EC cells from germ-free mice produced approximately 60 percent less serotonin than did their peers with conventional bacterial colonies. When these germ-free mice were recolonized with normal gut microbes, the serotonin levels went back up—showing that the deficit in serotonin can be reversed. "EC cells are rich sources of serotonin in the gut. What we saw in this experiment is that they appear to depend on microbes to make serotonin—or at least a large portion of it," says [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:50+00:00 January 8th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Microbes Help produce Serotonin in Gut

How to Build a Culture of Good Health Physical well-being depends on more than keeping our bodies fit. Emotions and the people who come into our lives matter just as much.

In effect, when we repress emotions—just as when we are completely at their mercy, such as in moments of untrammeled rage—we are playing havoc with our nervous system, hormonal apparatus, immune system, intestines, heart, and other organs. The result can be chronic or acute illness. As repressed anger eventually turns against us, the immune system can as well, as in autoimmune disorders, for example. “I never get angry,” says a character in one of Woody Allen’s movies. “I grow a tumor instead.” Much more scientific truth is captured in that droll remark than many doctors would recognize. Mainstream medical practice largely ignores the role of emotions in the physiological functioning of the human organism. Yet the scientific evidence abundantly shows that people’s lifetime emotional experiences profoundly influence health and illness. And, since emotional patterns are a response to the psychological and social environment, disease in an individual always tells us about the multigenerational family of origin and the broader culture in which that person’s life unfolds. We human beings are biopsychosocial creatures whose health or illness reflects our relationship with the world we inhabit—including all the variables of family, class, gender, race, political status, and the physical ecology of which we are a part. A recent article from the National Institutes of Health called for a new foundational theory for medicine, based on a “biopsychosocial-ecological paradigm.” Given the ideological limitations of mainstream medicine, this forward-looking initiative is not likely to be heeded soon. As early as the second century, the Roman physician Galen noted the connection between emotional burden and illness, an observation repeated by many other clinicians over the centuries. The pathway from stressful emotions, often unconscious, to physical disease was often driven home to me as a family physician and palliative care practitioner, although nothing in my medical [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:51+00:00 December 3rd, 2015|Blog|Comments Off on How to Build a Culture of Good Health Physical well-being depends on more than keeping our bodies fit. Emotions and the people who come into our lives matter just as much.

How to Get Vitamin A on your Raw Vegan Diet

Vitamin A is a group of similar molecules that includes retinol, retinal, and retinoic acid. It is an essential nutrient that we need to get from our diets.  It is needed for growth, healthy skin and hair, mucus membranes, digestive juices, our immune system, and also for good eye health and vision.  Its name, retinol or retinal, comes from its abundance in the retina of the eye.  Vitamin A works with vitamin D to normalise immune tolerance and vitamin A deficiency predisposes individuals to gut mucosal damage.1 Vitamin A levels are also important in thyroid health as it is needed for the uptake of Iodine2 and is required for the thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3) to bind to intracellular receptors.  The most important fact about vitamin A is the difference between retinoid and carotenoids. The vitamin A from animal sources is retinoid, also called retinol, while plant sources of vitamin A is carotenoids, specifically three forms which are α-carotene, b-carotene and β-cryptoxanthin which can be from food or supplements and converted to Retinol. There are three other carotenoids, Lycopene, Lutein, and Zeaxanthin all of which cannot be converted into retinol but also have their own specific role in human health. Whilst fat assists in the absorbtion of carotenoids and conversion to Vitamin A, Fibre can inhibit this process. Whilst cooking some foods can give a higher carotenoid and higher antioxidant level with great absorption and therefore greater conversion to Vitamin A, the heating process will diminish other vitamin properties within the food source such as Vitamin C which unlike the Fat soluable Vitamin A, Vitamin C is water soluable. a-Carotenoids – converts at a ratio of 1/24 (24mcg of a-carotenoids = 1mcg of retinol) b-Carotenoids – converts at a ratio of 1/12 (12mcg of b-carotenoids = 1mcg of retinol) b-Cryptoxanthin – [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:52+00:00 November 26th, 2015|Blog|Comments Off on How to Get Vitamin A on your Raw Vegan Diet

Do you get enough calcium on a Raw vegan Diet ?

Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the human body. About 99% of the calcium in the body is found in bones and teeth, while the other 1% is found in the blood and soft tissue. Calcium concentrations in the blood and fluid surrounding the cells (extracellular fluid) must be maintained within a narrow concentration range for normal physiological functioning. The physiological functions of calcium are so vital to survival that the body will stimulate bone resorption (demineralization) to maintain normal blood calcium concentrations when calcium intake is inadequate. Thus, adequate intake of calcium is a critical factor in maintaining a healthy skeleton. Vitamin D is essential to the absorption of calcium and is especially important in childhood and adolscence when bone growth and density is increasing. If you follow a vegan diet it is especially important to maintain your vitamin D intake to ensure calcium absorption. Calcium absorption is enhanced by milk and milk products, low sodium (including salt) intake and high potassium intake. However, absorption is inhibited by phytates (cereal foods, tea and coffee), oxalates in spinach, chard and rhubarb and supplemental intakes of minerals such as zinc. Calcium is present in milk and dairy products (cheese and yoghurt), leafy green vegetables (but not spinach), bread and foods containing white or brown flour, nuts, sesame seeds, tofu, pulses, fortified soya drinks and tap water in hard water areas.     Deficiency A low blood calcium level (hypocalcemia) usually implies abnormal parathyroid function since the skeleton provides a large reserve of calcium for maintaining normal blood levels, especially in the case of low dietary calcium intake. Other causes of abnormally low blood calcium concentrations include chronic kidney failure, vitamin D deficiency, and low blood magnesium levels often observed in cases of severe alcoholism. Magnesium deficiency can impair parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion by [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:52+00:00 November 26th, 2015|Blog|Comments Off on Do you get enough calcium on a Raw vegan Diet ?

What is Complex Trauma and Healing Developmental Trauma at Trauma Recovery Institute

A person who experiences early trauma, regardless of its source, does not feel welcomed into the world. When, at the beginning of life, for whatever reason, we do not feel welcomed, we find it difficult to develop a sense of our right to exist, of our sense of self, and of our entitlement to fully live. The life theme of this earliest survival style develops in relation to the issue of connection. Our earliest experiences of life in utero, at birth, and with early attachment shape our relationship to feeling secure in our capacity for contact. When this capacity for connection is in place, it supports our right to be and is the foundation upon which the healthy self is built. Early trauma compromises our sense of safety and existence in the world and our capacity for connection: we do not learn how to connect to ourselves, to our body, or to others. Our earliest trauma and attachment experiences form a template for our lifelong psychological, physiological and relational patterns. The identity of individuals with early trauma is shaped by the distress they experienced in early life. Difficulties at this initial Connection stage of development undermine healthy progression through all later stages, impacting self image, self esteem, and the capacity for healthy relationships. Trauma in this Connection phase is the basis for many seemingly unrelated cognitive, emotional, and physiological problems. From Healing Developmental Trauma by Laurence Heller, PhD and Aline LaPierre, PsyD, published by North Atlantic Books, copyright © 2012 by Laurence Heller, PhD and Aline LaPierre, PsyD. Reprinted by permission of publisher.   Early Events That May Cause Long-Term Traumatic Reactions   Caregiver Related A family where one or both parents struggle with Connection issues themselves A mother who is chronically depressed, dissociated, or angry Being the result of [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:53+00:00 November 25th, 2015|Blog|Comments Off on What is Complex Trauma and Healing Developmental Trauma at Trauma Recovery Institute

Learn How to Repair your Brain & Repair your Gut Flora for Optimum Health & Brain Health

Are you among the 20 percent of adults suffering from anxiety and depression? Find out how nourishing your gut microbiome can make you happier and more relaxed.  At the California Center for Functional Medicine, a significant number of our patients list anxiety or depression as one of their top three health concerns. This is not at all surprising given that anxiety and depression are two of the most common mental health issues in our society, with anxiety disorders affecting approximately 18% of adults in the U.S. Anxiety and depression are not the same, but they are often experienced together as a complex set of emotional and functional changes.  Both anxiety and depression, along with other mood and neuropsychiatric disorders, such as eating disorders, bipolar disorder or sleep disorders, generally result from a complex interplay of factors. These may include a combination of nutritional, physical, environmental, social, emotional, and spiritual factors, affecting your genetic tendencies and brain biochemistry (meaning that your neurotransmitters, or the chemical messengers within your brain, can be affected by these key components of well-being). You can think of anxiety and depression as disruptions in brain health.   A growing body of evidence shows that our beneficial gut bacteria support positive mood and emotional well-being The gut microbiome, which we’ve discussed in a number of prior articles , refers to the microorganisms, predominately bacteria (somewhere on the order of 10 to 100 trillion) and their genes, living within the human gut. Many of these microorganisms are in fact essential for good health. When the balance of beneficial bacteria in the gut is disrupted, disease can occur. The relatively new understanding of how microorganisms affect every system of our body, along with the incredible volume of research on the microbiome is leading to a shift within medicine, and specifically a [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:53+00:00 November 21st, 2015|Blog|Comments Off on Learn How to Repair your Brain & Repair your Gut Flora for Optimum Health & Brain Health

Psychotherapy, Raw Food Training, Nutritional Counselling, Addiction Recovery & Sexual Trauma Recovery at Life Change Health Institute

Life Change Health Institute is a world unique holistic treatment centre specialising in mind body medicine. We offer expertise in five main areas of focus which are Trauma Recovery Psychotherapy, Healthy Sexuality, Plant Based Nutrition, Conscious Parenting and Conscious Lifestyle. Our approach to addressing the mind body connection and how stress can massively impact and impair our development, our brains and our bodies has been developed from the latest research and developments in attachmnet theory, affect regulation,object relations theory,  neuroscience and interpersonal neurobiology. At Life Change Health Institute, we believe trauma underlies all conditions. Trauma, whether related to addiction, attachment or abuse, can reverberate through the many facets of our lives, follow us into adulthood and inhibit us from living in the present. We treat a wide variety of conditions with a number of treatment strategies with the objective of addressing the root trauma at the heart of each person's life challenge. At Life Change Health Institute we are experts in working with complex trauma. We promote plant based nutrition, healthy sexuality, conscious lifestyle changes and long term psychotherapeutic relationships in order to maintain optimum health and well being.   Services offered at Life Change Health Institute Individual & Group Psychotherapy with Trauma Recovery Institute Nutritional Counselling with Functional Health approach Sexuality work with Embodied Tantra Ireland Raw Food Mastery courses with Plant Based Academy Conscious Parenting workshops with Conscious Parenting Ireland   Contact us for expert support if you can identify with any of the following, 1)Recovering from an illness or trauma 2)Seeking a Time-Out 3)Looking to embrace a healthier fuller lifestyle of love and happiness 4)Experiencing challenges in realtionships and sexuality 5)Suffering with personality disorders and / or addictions 6)Struggling as a parent of young children and teens 7)Felling like trauma from the past is holding you back in present at work and relationships   [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:54+00:00 November 20th, 2015|Blog|Comments Off on Psychotherapy, Raw Food Training, Nutritional Counselling, Addiction Recovery & Sexual Trauma Recovery at Life Change Health Institute

Dance, The Intimacy of Dance & The Healing Power of Dance – Full Article

Dance involves the culturally mediated body, emotion, and mind. So do illness and pain. Dance may promote wellness by strengthening the immune system through muscular action and physiological processes. Dance conditions an individual to moderate, eliminate, or avoid tension, chronic fatigue, and other disabling conditions that result from the effects of stress. Dance may help the healing process as a person gains a sense of control through (1) possession by the spiritual in dance, (2) mastery of movement, (3) escape or diversion from stress and pain through a change in emotion, states of consciousness, and/or physical capability, and (4) confronting stressors to work through ways of handling their effects. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c-tW0CkvdDI   Dance is your pulse, your heartbeat, your breathing. It’s the rhythm of your life. Jacques d’Amboise   The Spiritual Power Of Dance By Gabrielle Roth Each of us is a moving center, a space of divine mystery. And though we spend most of our time on the surface in the daily details of ordinary existence, most us hunger to connect to this space within, to break through to bliss, to be swept away into something bigger than us. As a young dancer, I made the transition from the world of steps and structures to the world of transformation and trance by exposure to live drumming. The beats, the patterns, the rhythms kept calling me deeper and deeper into my dance. Being young, wild and free, it didn't dawn on me that in order to go into deep ecstatic places, I would have to be willing to transform absolutely everything that got in my way. That included every form of inertia: the physical inertia of tight and stressed muscles; the emotional baggage of depressed, repressed feelings; the mental baggage of dogmas, attitudes and philosophies. In other words, I'd have to let it all [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:55+00:00 November 19th, 2015|Blog|Comments Off on Dance, The Intimacy of Dance & The Healing Power of Dance – Full Article

Medicinal Mushroms from Life Change Health Institute and Liquified Medicinal Tonic Bar

  REISHI Main active components, Reishi’s wide-ranging health benefits are due to its combination of highly active immune-modulating polysaccharides and over 130 triterpenoid compounds (primarily ganoderic and lucidenic acids), with actions including: anti-inflammatory, antihistamine, sedative, anti-hypertensive and anti-cancer1. Traditional use, Reishi has traditionally been associated with the Taoist quest for immortality, as well as being used to treat a range of health conditions, including: cancer, heart disease and bronchitis.     Main Health Benefits Cancer, Reishi has a long history of use in cancer treatment with many reports of spontaneous remission2. Although both polysaccharides and triterpenes contribute to Reishi’s anti-cancer action, clinical trials have focussed exclusively the more easily characterised polysaccharide extracts, with a recent review of 5 randomised controlled trials indicating that patients given Reishi polysaccharide extracts were 1.27 times more likely to respond positively to chemo/radiotherapy than those without3. At the same time, Reishi’s triterpenes also show extensive anticancer activity, inhibiting cancer cell growth, inducing apoptosis (cell death) and, in the case of prostate cancer cells, blocking androgen receptors4. Allergies, Reishi’s combination of high immuno-modulatory activity with strong anti-inflammatory and anti- histamine activity make it a uniquely suitable supplement for those suffering from allergies such as hayfever (allergic rhinitis)5. By addressing both the underlying immune imbalance that predisposes the body to overreacting to pollen or other allergens, as well as the histamine-mediated inflammatory responses that result, it can be used to both help alleviate the symptoms and prevent their development. Auto-immune disease, Reishi’s combination of immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory action also makes it a useful supplement for a range of inflammatory auto-immune conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis or ulcerative colitis. Insomnia/anxiety, The traditional name ‘spirit mushroom’ points to the sedative action of Reishi’s triterpenoid components. Improvements in sleep patterns are one of the most commonly reported effects of Reishi supplementation and it is frequently prescribed for this [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:57+00:00 November 16th, 2015|Blog|Comments Off on Medicinal Mushroms from Life Change Health Institute and Liquified Medicinal Tonic Bar

Radical Aliveness Psychotherapy & Nutritional Counselling at Life Change Health Institute Dublin

Individual & Group Psychotherapy Life Change Health Institute offers world unique individual & group psychotherapy. We specialize in long-term relational trauma recovery, sexual trauma recovery and early childhood trauma recovery. We offer a very gentle, safe, supportive and compassionate space for deep relational work with highly skilled, trained and experienced psychotherapists. Dynamic (PT) PsychoSocialSomatic Therapy seeks to heal early experiences of abandonment, neglect, trauma, and attachment loss, that otherwise tend to play out repetitively and cyclically throughout the lifespan in relationship struggles, illness and addictions. It is unique in that it approaches the body first (bottom-up processing) and unlike any other form of therapy also integrates the social element of looking at the clients nutrition, environment, support structures, relationships, level of intimacy and attachment style, incoporating transference focused therapy, gestalt, psychodynamic psychotherapy, attachment theory, somatic psychotherapy and interpersonal neurobiology. Everyone sees the unseen in proportion to the clarity of his heart, and that depends upon how much he has polished it. Whoever has polished it more sees more — more unseen forms become manifest to him. Rumi Who is Psychotherapy for? Everybody is welcome, whether you are a psychotherapy student, an advocate of personal development and self-inquiry, a trauma survivor or currently struggling with an addiction, a relationship, as a parent or with an illness and would like to talk with someone and get professional support.   What Happens in Psychotherapy? In an atmosphere of support, compassion, non-judgment, acceptance and awareness, using Dynamic (PT) PsychoSocialSomatic Therapy, we pierce through layers of protection. This process allows one to uncover psychological patterns, release primal feelings and suppressed energy and thus return to the essence of who we are. Dynamic (PT) PsychoSocialSomatic Therapy is a powerful therapy that makes the connection between mind and body.   What is the Approach used? Radical Aliveness psychotherapy integrates [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:58+00:00 November 15th, 2015|Blog|Comments Off on Radical Aliveness Psychotherapy & Nutritional Counselling at Life Change Health Institute Dublin

The Courage to Love Tantric Path at Embodied Tantra Ireland

The Courage to Love is a unique journey for individuals or couples, empowering you to thrive in Love, Intimacy, sexuality and relationships. During our sessions we will explore any blocks to Intimacy and self love , challenges and destructive patterns in relationships and any negetive beliefs around sexuality and intimacy. This tantric path is a unique blend of Tantra and Attachment Theory within a psychodynamic framework. Learn how to to Embody Tantra and Live it. This is very powerful , safe, empowering, informative, psychoeducational, psychotherapeutic and liberating inner work. These sessions are suitable for people at all levels including complete beginners of Tantra practise and is perfect for anybody looking to create a healthy relationship with strong boundaries, communication, intimacy, connection, love, happiness and passionate love making.   "Tantra is not technique but prayer. Is not head oriented but a relaxation into the heart. Please remember it. Many books have been written onTantra, they all talk about technique but the real Tantra has nothing to do with technique. The real Tantra cannot be written about, the real Tantra has to be imbibed(absorbed). How to imbibe real Tantra? You will have to transform your whole approach." Osho Embodied Tantra is a dive deeper, tantra with a difference, where not only will you learn tools for living intimately but get an opportunity to work through any blocks you have to intimacy. Our Clinic is at 24 Lower Baggot Street Dublin 2. Initial Consultation is 100 Euro. Book your consultation Now  or Fill our form below.     If the flame is a metaphor for love, then Playing with Fire is the white gauze for singed hands and seared hearts. A slow flicker at times, a wild dance. Playing with Fire will make the sap crackle from your veins, lift the burning leaves from [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:59+00:00 November 7th, 2015|Blog|Comments Off on The Courage to Love Tantric Path at Embodied Tantra Ireland

Functional Health at Life Change Health Institute – 5 Step Holistic Approach to Optimum Health

At Life Change Health Institute we adhere to the principles of Functional Health. Functional Health is a consilient view on healing. We view each person as a holistic human being in all their wonder and complexity. As we as humans have bodies, we look at an individual through the lens of chemistry, anatomy and nutrition, as we are living beings we look through the lens of biology, relationships and neurobiology, as we have a mind we look through the lens of psychology, as we function in groups we look through the lens of sociology, group dynamics and group psychology, as we have culture we look through the lens of anthropology. We take this view of humanity and challenges to humanity such as stress, disease and illness in all of the work we do at Life Change Health Institute. We do not believe that there is any one cause or any one solution or cure to any challenge we face. We have devised a world unique 5 Step Holistic Approach to Optimum Health which can be used to reverse disease and achieve radiant health, our approach is designed to address the root causes of disease rather than simply addressing symptomology.   Our 5 Step Holistic Approach to Optimum Health is    1) Eliminating toxic and inflammatory foods: 2) Rebuilding the Body & Rebuild the Gut: 3) Identifying environmental toxins: 4) Healing autoimmune-related infections: 5) Trauma release process:   Follow this program, Whether you're battling multiple sclerosis, thyroid disease, autoimmune disease, IBS or Graves' disease, or you simply want to put an end to nagging minor symptoms, Our Holistic approach, based on the latest scientific research is designed to fight and defeat the full spectrum of autoimmune diseases. If you would like to get more detail information about our 5 Step Holistic Approcah to [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:39:59+00:00 November 7th, 2015|Blog|Comments Off on Functional Health at Life Change Health Institute – 5 Step Holistic Approach to Optimum Health

Coconut sugar, Is it Healthy By Steve alder

Being a chocolate maker (someone who makes chocolate from scratch), I am always on the lookout for great sweeteners to use in Sacred Chocolate. Several years ago, a vendor approached me trying to sell me coconut sugar (aka coconut palm sugar as opposed to palm sugar which is not from a coconut tree) as a healthy sweetener because of its relatively low glycemic index of 35. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QHWuQj95SYw I was excited about the possibility of a good tasting, inexpensive sweetener that was also heathier than refined cane sugar. Could this be the ultimate sweetener redemption? It seemed too good to be true to my sometimes skeptical engineering mind. I asked for proof, and was directed to this published paper: Click Here for Paper  My concerns with this study were twofold. The study was conducted on only 10 people. And, the study was done by a government who is one of the largest producers of coconut sugar in the world. Personally, I was hesitant to make an informed decision until more independent studies were conducted. Unfortunately, the only other study I have seen since shows a glycemic index for coconut sugar to be 54 as can been seen here: Click Here to View Study A whole raw chocolate industry has popped up over the last few years touting coconut sugar as a low glycemic sweetener citing the first study above. But, as can be seen from the second study, further studies need to be conducted since there is such a difference between the two: 35 vs 54. I am not the only one with concern regarding the ambiguity associated with what is known about the glycemic index of coconut palm sugar as evidenced by these links: Link 1 Link 2 Link 3 Through my experience as a chocolate maker for almost 10 [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:40:00+00:00 November 7th, 2015|Blog|Comments Off on Coconut sugar, Is it Healthy By Steve alder

Learn to thrive on a Raw Vegan Diet with Raw Food Mastery Training at Life Change Health Institute Dublin

Plant Based academy is a raw and vegan culinary school. Training, educating and empowering students on plant based culinary art, vegan nutritional science and conscious living. Plant Based Academy is the only classically structured raw food course in Europe and world unique in its content, Certification and delivery. Plant Based Academy offers a number of comprehensive and single module raw food programs both on site at our raw kitcehn and online – Raw Food Mastery Level I: Raw Food Essentials & Fermentation (2 Modules), Raw Food Mastery Level II: Advanced Raw Food Program (6 Modules), Level III: Professional Raw Food & conscious Living Program (12 Modules), Essential Raw Vegan Nutrition (Single Module), The Art of Fermentation (Single Module) and The Art of Raw Chocolate (Single Module). Plant Based Academy offers Raw Culinary Programs in Ireland, Spain and Bali.  www.PlantBasedAcademy.com    "To eat more healthily and naturally is today both an expectation and a necessity that must be translated into the field of haute cuisine. Exceptional produce expressing their simplicity, a technique that has the elegance to take a step back to their benefit. This is the cuisine I sincerely love. Cuisine of Naturalness, released, freed." Alain Ducasse – Chef of three Restaurants awarded with 3 Michelin star each.   Plant Based Academy, Raw & Vegan Culinary School Plant Based Academy is Europe’s first and only classically structured plant-based culinary school. Students will discover that raw food is not always cold food, which is particularly refreshing when living in a cold climate such as Ireland. Students will learn about Warm Porridge and warm soups, hot medicinal beverages. Dublin is host to some of the best farmers’ markets in Ireland and has a rapidly growing plant based community.Students learn how to work with whole, organic, unprocessed, plant-based foods to achieve healthy, aesthetically refined, [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:40:00+00:00 November 7th, 2015|Blog|Comments Off on Learn to thrive on a Raw Vegan Diet with Raw Food Mastery Training at Life Change Health Institute Dublin

Memory: the link between past and future.

Memory has evolved, no doubt, because it is a benefit to survival. This is quite clearly evident in many different ways: We remember where food is; we remember who is a friend and who is a foe; we remember details; we remember stories and narra- tives that give us place and culture; we remember fears; and we remember pleasures. We remember many things to help us be safer and more successful in the future. I say “the future” because that is what memory is all about holding the experience of the present in such a way that it can be useful in the future. Colloquially, we say that we “learn from our ex- perience”. This actually means that memory is not just a benign storing of information, but a resource that can be accessed; it is something that is encod- ed, stored, and then retrieved (Baddeley, Eyesenck, & Anderson, 2009). What occurs in the present is encoded by biological processes and stored some- where. This recording of the present soon becomes an artefact of the past but, once retrieved, returns to the present again. Memory is something of a time machine. It is a link between what was and what might be. Memory can—and does—influence what we will do in the next moment. Memory is a powerful thing. The Way We Live Our behaviour, our responses, our actions, are af- fected by a number of inbuilt qualities and quantities that we bring with us into this world as the building blocks of our ongoing development, or nature. Many things contribute to our “nature”, including: instinct (Winston, 2003); temperament (Kagan & Snidman, 2004); evolutionary genetic “hardwired” patterns (Watson & Crick, 1953); gene mutations and poly- morphisms (Bull, 2000); neural architecture (Osch- ner & Gross, 2007); and immediate levels of demand by the [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:40:01+00:00 October 30th, 2015|Blog|Comments Off on Memory: the link between past and future.

Another Personality Disorder – The Psychopath a Neuroscientific view

Four Neuropsychological Models Recent work in neuroscience is revealing that the brains of psychopaths are different from those of normal people in several interesting ways. Whether these differences should be considered malfunctions of brain systems that operate in normal people, or are part of a genetically different type of brain, will probably have to be decided on a case-by-case basis. But whatever the cause of these differences, they raise the question as to whether psychopaths can be held legally responsible for the mayhem they create. We exempt people with schizophrenia and very low IQs from legal responsibility—so why should we not do the same with psychopaths? Currently there are four different theories, or models, offering explanations or reasons why these differences in the brains of psychopaths cause them to be so callous towards others, and such a danger to society at large. I will describe these four approaches in the sections below; then, at the end of the article, I consider briefly how some of the findings that have been used to support the different theories may also be used to construct a hypothesis according to which at least some psychopaths are clearly legally responsible. The attentional model According to Joseph Newman and his colleagues, the primary problem in psychopathy is a failure of what he calls “response modulation” (Hiatt & New- man, 2006; Motzkin, Newman, Kiehl, & Koenigs, 2011; Newman, Patterson, & Kosson, 1987). Normal people are able to alter what they are doing when the demands of the task change. Thus, when we undertake a task, we focus our attention on certain parts of that task—but sometimes information in the periphery becomes relevant and the new infor- mation should force us to change our actions. The brain contains two attentional systems: top-down and bottom-up. Top-down attention tends to [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:40:01+00:00 October 30th, 2015|Blog|Comments Off on Another Personality Disorder – The Psychopath a Neuroscientific view

The Mind-Body Connection working with Bodily Experiences

EMOTIONS ARE ONE of the most salient components of psychotherapy. The neuroscience view of emotion is related to, but distinct from, the way clini- cians usually define and think about emotion. In usual clinical parlance, the terms emotions, feelings, and affects are all used interchangeably. In contrast, the neuroscience view of emotion refers specifically to subcortical, often body- based experiences and not the conscious awareness of a feeling. Often, thoughnot necessarily, the body-based experience serves as a platform or scaffolding upon which the subsequent consciously experienced feeling or affect is built. Emotions form in the subcortical systems, are often experienced in the body before entering consciousness, and have a significant effect on judgment and decision making. This view of emotion affirms that a lot is happening within a person nonconsciously before there is any conscious aware- ness of it. Alerting patients to their bodily experience may help attune them a bit more quickly to what might lie below the surface. For some patients, alerting them to attend to their bodies’ signals gives them a way of accessing their emotions when language does not suffice. The neuroscience view of emotion can be integrated into mainstream psychody- namic clinical practice to offer another rich pathway for clinical exploration, intervention, and transformation. As most psychodynamic therapists would likely agree, the body as a source of understanding emotion is underutilized in mainstream clinical practice. There is consensus among neuroscien- tists, neurobiologists, and neuropsycholo- gists that emotions are not necessarily “felt experiences” but are formed in the body prior to any conscious awareness of a feel- ing (e.g., see the work of Da-masio, 1994, 1999; Ekman, 2003; LeDoux, 1996; Pally, 1998a; Pally, R. & Olds, D., 2000; Siegel, 1999). There are some nuanced definitional differences among leading neuroscientists, with Panksepp noting that emotions can start [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:40:01+00:00 October 30th, 2015|Blog|Comments Off on The Mind-Body Connection working with Bodily Experiences

A Malady of Representations, Dysautonomic Aspects of Borderline Personality Disorder

There is an important category of borderline personality disorder (BPD) phe- nomena that is very often overlooked but that may relate to the core of the disorder. It is overlooked, first, because the patient does not report it and, second, because, if reported, it seems incidental to the main clinical picture and also inexplicable. It appears as an almost literal imprint in the body, particularly the skin, of a fragment of traumatic experience. The symptoms of this phenomenon can be understood in terms of a disconnection theory of BPD. They seem to reflect autonomic nervous activity that is independent of, and unco- ordinated with, higher systems, particularly the prefrontal cortex. Rule et al. (2002) have proposed that the orbitofrontal cortex is central to the top-down regulation of subcortical functioning of structures such as the autonomic system, the hypothalamus, and the amyg- dala, all involved in the induction, activation, encoding, and elicitation of emotion. The phe- nomenon considered in this chapter appears to reflect a loss of this regulation and to mani- fest a “dissociation” of the autonomic nervous system activity from prefrontal regulation, particularly as it controls the dermal vascular bed. Quite intricate patterns of skin sensation and even skin markings arise in some traumatized patients with BPD, like sensory “maps” of parts of the trauma. Here are some examples: A young woman who had been in therapy for about a year telephoned her therapist some time after a session, which was an unusual thing for her to do, and reported that as she was preparing for a shower, she noticed a number of bruises behind her knees, which bewildered her. The therapist saw her the next day and found several linear but incomplete lesions behind the patient’s knees. This incident might perhaps have been anticipated since, several years before entering [...]

By | 2017-12-01T13:40:06+00:00 October 30th, 2015|Blog|Comments Off on A Malady of Representations, Dysautonomic Aspects of Borderline Personality Disorder
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